Buffalo Soldiers National Museum (formerly the Houston Light Guard Armory) by Alfred C. Finn, 1925. Photo: Peter Molick.

Buffalo Soldiers National Museum (formerly the Houston Light Guard Armory) by Alfred C. Finn, 1925. Photo: Peter Molick.

forWARDS: A Driving Tour of Houston’s Third Ward, Part 3

This is the fifth in a series of 10 self-guided driving tours of Houston’s original six wards, written by architectural historian Stephen Fox. All the tours are collected in a limited-edition zine, forWARDS, that was published in conjunction with RDA’s 40th annual architecture tour. The zine, designed by Spindletop Design and illustrated with photography by Peter Molick, can be purchased for $15. Call 713-348-4876 or email rda at rice.edu.

Start on Elgin Avenue and Chenevert Street. Pass Elizabeth Baldwin Park, the second oldest public park in Houston. The section of Third Ward east of Texas 288, now called Midtown, was historically known as the South End. The South End was Houston’s most elite residential neighborhood before development in the Montrose area began after 1905. Pass the Moran Center at 1410 Elgin (2011, Leslie Elkins).

Turn left onto Caroline Street, then left onto Holman Avenue. The South End Junior High School (now Houston Community College’s San Jacinto Memorial Building) at 1300 Holman was erected in 1914 (Layton & Smith; modernistic wings by Hedrick & Gottlieb, 1928, and Joseph Finger, 1936) and terminates the axis on Caroline. Brown Reynolds Watford just restored the monumental classical building. The Learning Hub and Science Center to the left of the main building is by Kirksey (2007). The 10-acre campus site is another undivided Holman outlot.

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The ex-Douglass Elementary School (1926, Hedrick & Gottlieb). Photos: Peter Molick.

The ex-Douglass Elementary School (1926, Hedrick & Gottlieb). Photos: Peter Molick.

forWARDS: A Driving Tour of Houston’s Third Ward, Part 2

This is the fourth in a series of 10 self-guided driving tours of Houston’s original six wards, written by architectural historian Stephen Fox. Click for Fox’s tours of First and Second wards and the first of his three-part tour of Third Ward. All the tours are collected in a limited-edition zine, forWARDS, that was published in conjunction with RDA’s 40th annual architecture tour. The zine, designed by Spindletop Design and illustrated with photography by Peter Molick, can be purchased for $15. Call 713-348-4876 or email rda at rice.edu.

Start at St. Emanuel and Grey Street below the I-45 / US 59 interchange. Head south into what is most commonly thought of today as Third Ward. The Houston Police Department South Central Patrol Division at 2202 St. Emanuel bounds the edge of the neighborhood. At the Hadley Avenue-St. Emanuel intersection is the Hadley complex of eight shotgun ranch houses, a post-war form of the “row house” complex at 2102 St. Emanuel. At 2501 St. Emanuel and McIlhenny, the Chua Dai-Goac Buddhist Temple occupies a rustic compound.

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Harris County Courthouse (1910, Lang & Witchell). Photos: Peter Molick.

Harris County Courthouse (1910, Lang & Witchell). Photos: Peter Molick.

forWARDS: A Driving Tour of Houston’s Third Ward, Part 1

This is the third in a series of 10 self-guided driving tours of Houston’s original six wards, written by architectural historian Stephen Fox. Read Fox’s tour of First and Second wards here. The tours are collected in a limited-edition zine, forWARDS, that was published in conjunction with RDA’s 40th annual architecture tour. The zine, designed by Spindletop Design and illustrated with photography by Peter Molick, can be purchased for $15. Call 713-348-4876 or email rda at rice.edu.

Of Houston’s six wards, Third Ward had experienced the most extensive territorial expansion by 1905. Consequently it encompasses a wide variety of landscapes, although these are now split by Interstate 45, U.S. 59, and Texas 288.

Because of the way traffic is routed, this tour starts on Preston Avenue at Main Street, one block south of the Main-Congress intersection. Courthouse Square, one of Houston’s two original public squares, lies in Third Ward. It is occupied by the fifth Harris County Courthouse (1910, Lang & Witchell) to be built in the square; the courthouse was spectacularly restored in 2011 (PGAL and ArchiTexas).

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Westheimer and Gessner. Photo: Raj Mankad.

Westheimer and Gessner. Photo: Raj Mankad.

Street View: Houston is the 53 Briar Forest

Every day for almost a year I caught the 5:00 a.m. 53 Briar Forest Limited bus from a stop close to Downtown, and I rode it all the way to the end of the line, getting off at Westside High School, where I started my day as a science teacher. The two-hour ride got me home by 6:30 p.m. Eat, sleep, rinse, repeat, every day for months. This commute was by necessity: several years before, I had been in an accident that left me with severe traffic-related anxiety, making driving all but impossible. Sound tiring? The truth is that I became part of a community of fellow riders.

Every morning, my work began when I got on the bus, when I got out my laptop to work on that day’s lesson plans. The first few months went by in a blurry haze. Planning on the ride to school, followed by lesson setup, followed by teaching, followed by grading, followed by an exhausted ride home, in which I tried to let my mind switch off. This turned into its own rhythm. On the dark bus ride in the morning, we were a group of regulars, quiet as we geared up for another day. The ride home was noisier, filled with the energy of students. As my mind became accustomed to the particular stops and turns, I began to look forward to a specific moment on the ride home, after the bus turned from Gessner onto Westheimer. As the bus began jolting its way down a long stretch of road, the entire city of Houston began opening up in front of me. Looking at the long stretch of road with a clustering of skyscrapers, I saw Houston as a city of possibilities.

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Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church (1924, Frederick B. Gaenslen). Photos: Pete Molick.

Blessed Sacrament Catholic Church (1924, Frederick B. Gaenslen). Photos: Pete Molick.

forWARDS: A Driving Tour of Houston’s Second Ward

This is the second in a series of 10 self-guided driving tours of Houston’s original six wards, written by architectural historian Stephen Fox. Read Fox’s tour of First Ward here. The tours are collected in a limited-edition zine, forWARDS, that was published in conjunction with RDA’s 40th annual architecture tour. The zine, designed by Spindletop Design and illustrated with photography by Peter Molick, can be purchased for $15. Call 713-348-4876 or email rda at rice.edu.

Second Ward retains much more of its historic residential fabric than does First Ward. It extended almost all the way east to the Navigation-Lockwood intersection, the east city limit line of Houston in 1905.

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Photos: Tom Flaherty.

Photos: Tom Flaherty.

Hit Hard in Meyerland: A Photo Essay

One area particularly affected by the recent floods in Houston was Meyerland. Here, Tom Flaherty shares his observations and a series of photographs after a walk near South Braeswood and South Rice.

Though we were spared any damage from the flooding, we had friends who live in Meyerland who were hit hard. My wife and I helped them out by washing clothes and drying hundreds of family photos. The photos I worked on were from a friend of my wife whom I didn’t know. So it was a strange feeling “getting to know” all those family members I repeatedly saw in those photos. And it was sad to know that their household was turned inside out and upside down by the flooding. As a photographer, I decided to go walk the flooded neighborhood and document the street scene six days after the initial flood.

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A packed 246 Bay Area commuter bus. All photos: Raj Mankad.

A packed 246 Bay Area commuter bus. All photos: Raj Mankad.

Houston to Galveston by Bus: An Adventure Across Transit Systems that Overlap Without Touching

I reached the sea without getting in a car. Over the course of my journey, which began at Rice University and ended at Stewart Beach, I took one light rail train, four buses, and walked about three miles. Every three or four minutes, I took a photograph with my phone and I compiled a video embedded below.

If the various local and federal pots of money that paid for the two major legs of the trip had been used in a coordinated manner, as part of a regional system, the $7.50 trip would have taken about an hours and a half instead of four.

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Workshop Houston campus models. Rice Building Workshop.

Workshop Houston campus models. Rice Building Workshop.

Workshop Houston’s New Campus, Born from Rice Design Alliance Charrette

On May 28, Workshop Houston, a nonprofit offering innovative youth development programming, broke ground on a series of buildings on its property at Sauer Street and Holman in the Third Ward. The organization teaches creative problem-solving and collaboration to students as they make music, bikes, and clothing in the Beats Shop, Chopper Shop, and Style Shop, and study in the Scholar Shop.

That same spirit of learning through brainstorming, trial, and revision at Workshop Houston also gave birth, over the course of four years, to the organization’s new campus. In August 2011, the Rice Design Alliance (publisher of OffCite) conducted its annual charrette, asking several architectural teams to design a new scheme for Workshop Houston. More than 20 designers from around the city participated, and their designs were reviewed anonymously — jurors did not know who any of the participants were. One group stood out.

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Looking at Cite 95. Photo: Carrie Schneider.

Looking at Cite 95. Photo: Carrie Schneider.

Participatory Drawing: Fuel Drips on Concrete

Artist Carrie Schneider reflects on “Horizon Lines” with a new artwork in which she erases cars from an aerial photograph by Alex MacLean of a Houston highway interchange. An animation showing the original photo fading into the artwork and the artwork itself are below.

Since being struck by the first section of Cite 95, I’ve been driving around with the satellite view on my Google maps. Instead of pastel road lines, I’m navigating between driver’s-seat-eye level and aerial perspective, through brown, gray, and green sandcastles punctuated with the titles of sponsored destinations and locations tracked from my previous search history.

More than 30 years after Alex MacLean began the practice featured in “Horizon Lines,” now common in an age of drones, satellite imagery, and Google Earth, he has a lot of company up there. Much of it perhaps less interested in an enlarged collective or artistic perspective than increased height in the vertical distribution of resources, collecting have-alls-and-see-alls in superior, higher resolution space. So it’s mesmerizing, getting to see this landscape that’s so carefully withdrawn, hard to apprehend in more than just peeks.

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Approxmiate location of additional right of way and park, Downtown and EaDo. Photo: Alex Maclean.

Approxmiate location of additional right of way and park, Downtown and EaDo. Photo: Alex Maclean.

Ten Major Changes in the Plans to Expand I-45 You Might Not Know About

Also known as I45NorthAndMore.com, the North Houston Highway Improvement Project has made headlines not only because of the potential removal of the Pierce Elevated, but also of the possibility of turning it instead into a Sky Park.

There’s nothing quite so fetching in urban design these days as a Sky Park, but if you look beyond that glittery, and unlikely, dangling object, there’s a whole lot more to the proposal. Namely:

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