Kimbell Museum of Art [Photo Serge Ambrose]

The Stars are Big and Bright—Deep in the Heart of Texas

In the May 2009 Cite (78), Stephen Fox wrote a commentary on “astute Texan clients [who] have engaged the services of out-of-state star architects to produce buildings that set new design standards in Texas cities.” In the process of writing “The Stars are Big and Bright—Deep in the Heart of Texas” (click to download a pdf copy), he compiled a list of buildings constructed in Texas since 1886 by architects from around the world, not all of them stars by any means but nonetheless sought out by Texan clients. Fox has generously shared the list below with OffCite.org, and invites you to add projects by leaving a comment. (The list was originally posted June 2, and now includes additional buildings and bibliographic information.)

The List

St. Mark’s Church
315 E. Pecan St., San Antonio
1859-1875, Richard Upjohn (New York)
John C. Ferguson, “St. Mark’s and St. James’: The Upjohns in Texas,” Texas Architect 33 (July-August 1983): 54-60.

George W. Brackenridge House, Fern Hill
San Antonio
1883, Charles I. Berg (New York)
“Residence at San Antonio, Texas,” American Architect and Building News 14 (1 December 1883): plate section.

Col. W. E. Hughes House
Maple Ave., Dallas
c. 1884, Rossiter & Wright (New York)
“Residence for Col. W. E. Hughes,” American Architect and Building News 15 (1 March 1884): plate section.

First National Bank Building
213 E. Commerce St., San Antonio
1886, Cyrus L. W. Eidlitz (New York)
“San Antonio National Bank Building,” Architectural Record 1 (July-September 1891): 61.

St. James Church
156 N. Monroe St., La Grange
1886, Richard M. Upjohn (New York)
John C. Ferguson, “St. Mark’s and St. James’: The Upjohns in Texas,” Texas Architect 33 (July-August 1983): 54-60.

George Sealy House, The Open Gates
2424 Broadway, Galveston
1891, McKim, Mead & White (New York) with N. J. Clayton & Co.
Eleanor H, Gustafson, “’The Open Gates:’ The George Sealy House in Galveston,” Antiques 108 (September 1975): 508-514; Richard Guy Wilson, McKim, Mead & White Architects, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1983, pp. 124-127; Barrie Scardino and Drexel Turner, Clayton’s Galveston: The Architecture of Nicholas J. Clayton and His Contemporaries, College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2000, pp. 181-184.

Col. Edward M. House House
1704 West Ave., Austin (demolished)
1891, Frank Freeman (New York)
“Residence for Mr. E. M. House,” American Architect and Building News 32 (2 May 1891): plate section.

Tarrant County Courthouse
100 E. Weatherford St., Fort Worth
1895, Curtiss & Gunn (Kansas City)
Fred T. Comee, “Louis Curtiss of Kansas City,” Progressive Architecture 44 (August 1963): 128-134.

Isaac L. Ellwood House (Pompeian Villa Museum)
1953 Lake Shore Dr., Port Arthur
1900, Nimmons & Fellows (Chicago)

Rosenberg Library
823 Tremont St., Galveston
1904, Eames & Young (St. Louis)
Barrie Scardino and Drexel Turner, Clayton’s Galveston: The Architecture of Nicholas J. Clayton and His Contemporaries, College Station: Texas A&M University Press, 2000, pp. 192-194.

Union Passenger Station
S. Coldwell St. and W. San Francisco Ave., El Paso
1905, D. H. Burnham & Company (Chicago)
Jim Steely, “Rediscovering the Railroad Station,” Texas Architect 34 (May-June 1984): 52-53.

Scanlan Building
405 Main St., Houston
1909, D. H. Burnham & Co. (Chicago)
A. N. Rebori, “The Work of Burnham & Root, D. H. Burnham, D. H. Burnham & Co., and Graham, Burnham & Co.,” Architectural Record 38 (July 1915): 100.

Rather House (Episcopal Seminary of the Southwest)
3007 Duval St., Austin
1911, Brigham, Coveney & Bisbee (Boston) with Endress & Walsh

Majestic Theater
807 Texas Ave., Houston
1911, Mauran & Russell (St. Louis)
“Majestic Theater, Houston, Texas, Mauran & Russell, Architects, St. Louis, Missouri,” Western Architect 18 (September 1912): plate section.

Union Station
501 Crawford St., Houston
1911, Warren & Wetmore (New York)
Peter Pennoyer and Anne Walker, The Architecture of Warren and Wetmore, New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2006, pp. 113-115.

Southern Pacific Building
913 Franklin Ave., Houston
1911, Jarvis Hunt (Chicago)
“Southern Pacific Railway Building, Houston, Texas, Jarvis Hunt, Architect, Chicago, Illinois,” Western Architect 20 (September 1914): plate section.

Library (Battle Hall)
University of Texas, Austin
1911, Cass Gilbert (New York)
“Library, University of Texas, Austin, Texas, Cass Gilbert, Architect,” Architecture 26 (15 December 1912): plates 110-113; Carol McMichael, Paul Cret at Texas: Architectural Drawings and the Image of the University in the 1930s, Introduction by Drury Blakeley Alexander, Austin: The Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery, 1983; Lawrence W. Speck, “The University of Texas: Vision and Ambition,” in Cass Gilbert, Life and Work: Architecture of the Public Domain, edited by Barbara S. Christen and Steven Flanders, introduction by Robert A. M. Stern, New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2001, pp. 192-206.

Administration Building
Rice University, Houston
6100 Main Blvd., Houston
1909-12, Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson (Boston)
Franz Winkler, “The Administration Building of the Rice Institute, Houston, Texas,” Brickbuilder 21 (December 1912): 321-324; “William M. Rice Institute, Houston, Texas,” American Architect 102 (11 December 1912): 207-208.; “Rice Institute: Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson, Architects,” Western Architect 19 (February 1913): 20-22; The Work of Cram & Ferguson, Architects, Including the Work of Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson, Introduction by Charles D. Maginnis, New York: Pencil Points Press, 1929, plates 275-284; Frederick Gutheim, One Hundred Years of Architecture in America, New York: Reinhold Publishing, 1957, p. 50; William J. R. Curtis, Modern Architecture Since 1900, Upper Saddle River: Prentice-Hall, 1996, pp. 292-293.

First Presbyterian Church
902 W. Green Ave., Orange
1912, James Oliver Hogg (Kansas City)

Adolphus Hotel
1321 Commerce St., Dallas
1912, Barnett, Haynes & Barnett (St. Louis)
“The Adolphus Hotel, Dallas, Texas, Barnett, Haynes & Barnett, Architects,” Western Architect 18 (February 1912): plate section; “The Adolphus Hotel, Western Architect 20 (July 1914), pp. 80-82.

Casa Ricardo
206 W. Yoakum Ave., Kingsville (demolished)
1913, Louis S. Curtiss (Kansas City)
Fred T. Comee, “Louis Curtiss of Kansas City,” Progressive Architecture 44 (August 1963): 128-134, and Kingsville Merits Your Consideration: A Brief Submitted to the Locating Board, New State Normal Schools, 1917, privately printed, 1917.

St. Louis, Brownsville & Mexico Railway General Offices Building
101 W. Kleberg Ave., Kingsville (demolished)
1913, Louis S. Curtiss (Kansas City)
Fred T. Comee, “Louis Curtiss of Kansas City,” Progressive Architecture 44 (August 1963): 128 134, and Kingsville Merits Your Consideration: A Brief Submitted to the Locating Board, New State Normal Schools, 1917, privately printed, 1917.

Dallas Hall
Southern Methodist University, Dallas
1915, Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge (Chicago)

Texas Company Building
720 San Jacinto St., Houston
1915, Warren & Wetmore (New York)
Fiske Kimball. “Recent Architecture in the South,” Architectural Record 55 (March 1924): 261; Peter Pennoyer and Anne Walker, The Architecture of Warren and Wetmore, New York: W. W. Norton & Co., 2006, pp. 113-115.

Union Station
400 S. Houston St., Dallas
1916, Jarvis Hunt (Chicago)

Morris E. Berney House
1101 Broad Ave., Fort Worth
1916, Adler & Dangler (Chicago)
Stephen M. Salny, The Country Houses of David Adler, introduction by Franz Schulze, New York: W. W. Norton, 2001, pp. 34-35.

Mrs. Neil P. Anderson House
1110 Broad Ave., Fort Worth
1916, Adler & Dangler (Chicago)
Stephen M. Salny, The Country Houses of David Adler, introduction by Franz Schulze, New York: W. W. Norton, 2001, pp. 34-35.

Thomas J. Donoghue House
17 Courtlandt Place, Houston
1916, Warren & Wetmore (New York)

Gates Memorial Library
317 Stilwell Blvd., Port Arthur
1917, Warren & Wetmore (New York)

James G. McNary House (now St. Anthony Seminary)
4601 Hastings Dr., El Paso
1917, Myron C. Hunt (Pasadena)
Myron Hunt, 1868-1952: The Search for a Regional Architecture, Preface and acknowledgements by Jay Belloli, California Architecture and Architects, No. 4, Santa Monica: Hennessey & Ingalls, 1984.

St. Patrick Cathedral
1118 N. Mesa St., El Paso
1917, Barnett, Haynes & Barnett (St. Louis)

University Baptist Church
2310 Guadalupe St., Austin
1918, Albert E. Kelsey (Philadelphia) with F. E. Giesecke
“Perspective of Design for the University Baptist Church, Austin, Texas, Albert Kelsey, Architect,” The Architectural Review 6 (February 1918): plates 18-23.

City National Bank Building
2219 Market St., Galveston
1920, Weary & Alford (Chicago)
I. T. Frary, “The City National Bank of Galveston,” Architectural Record 49 (February 1921): 164-165, 186-187.

Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas Building
400 S. Akard St., Dallas
1921, Graham, Anderson, Probst & White (Chicago)
Sally A. Kitt Chappell, Architecture and Planning of Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, 1912-1936: Transforming Tradition, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992, pp. 133-134.

Humble Building
1212 Main St., Houston
1921, Clinton & Russell (New York)
Fiske Kimball. “Recent Architecture in the South,” Architectural Record 55 (March 1924): 230-231.

Magnolia Petroleum Building
108 S. Akard St., Dallas
1922, Alfred C. Bossom (New York) with Lang & Witchell
Alfred C. Bossom, Building to the Skies: The Romance of the Skyscraper, London: The Studio, Ltd., 1934; Dennis Sharpe and Peter Wylde, “Alfred Bossom and the American Skyscraper,” AAQ: Architectural Association Quarterly 13 (January-June 1982): 22-32; Fiske Kimball. “Recent Architecture in the South,” Architectural Record 55 (March 1924): 229.

Congregation Emanu El Temple
1120 Broadway, Beaumont
1923, Albert S. Gottlieb (New York)

Hugo V. Neuhaus House
8 Remington Lane, Houston
1923, Harrie T. Lindeberg (New York)
Mark A. Hewitt, “Harrie T. Lindeberg and Modern Domestic Architecture,” in H. T. Lindeberg, Domestic Architecture of H. T. Lindeberg, introductions by Royal Cortissoz and Mark A. Hewitt, New York: Acanthus Press, 1996, pp. xiii and 134-135.

Kenneth E. Womack House
8 Remington Lane, Houston
1923, Harrie T. Lindeberg (New York)

D. D. Peden House
2 Longfellow Lane, Houston
1924, Harrie T. Lindeberg (New York)

William S. Farish House
10 Remington Lane, Houston
1925, Harrie T. Lindeberg (New York)

United States National Bank Building
2201 Market St., Galveston
1925, Alfred C. Bossom (New York) with Sanguinet, Staats, Hedrick & Gottlieb (Houston)
Alfred C. Bossom, Building to the Skies: The Romance of the Skyscraper, London: The Studio, Ltd., 1934; Dennis Sharpe and Peter Wylde, “Alfred Bossom and the American Skyscraper,” AAQ: Architectural Association Quarterly 13 (January-June 1982): 22-32.

Houston Public Library
500 McKinney Ave., Houston
1926, Cram & Ferguson, William Ward Watkin, Louis A. Glover, and W. A. Dowdy
Julia Ideson, “The Houston Public Library, Houston, Texas,” Southern Architect and Building News 55 (November 1929): 69-73;Turner, Drexel. Lyceum to Landmark: The Julia Ideson Building of the Houston Public Library. Houston: Rice University School of Architecture and the Friends of the Houston Public Library, 1979.

Cleveland Sewall House
3456 Inwood Dr., Houston
1926, Cram & Ferguson (Boston) with Stayton Nunn
The Work of Cram & Ferguson, Architects, Including the Work of Cram, Goodhue & Ferguson, Introduction by Charles D. Maginnis, New York: Pencil Points Press, 1929, plates 336-337; “The Home of Mrs. Cleveland Sewall.” Antiques 53 (June 1948): 435; Susan Grant Lewin, “A New Life for a Grand Old Spanish Colonial,” House Beautiful 122 (September 1980): 108-111.

Petroleum Building
1314 Texas Ave., Houston
1927, Alfred C. Bossom (New York) with Maurice J. Sullivan and Briscoe & Dixon
“The Petroleum Building, Houston, Texas,” Southern Architect and Building News 54 (May 1928): 62, Alfred C. Bossom, Building to the Skies: The Romance of the Skyscraper, London: The Studio, Ltd., 1934; Dennis Sharpe and Peter Wylde, “Alfred Bossom and the American Skyscraper,” AAQ: Architectural Association Quarterly 13 (January-June 1982): 22-32.

Niels Esperson Building
808 Travis St., Houston
1927, John Eberson (New York)
“Niels Esperson Building, Houston, Texas, John Eberson, Architect,“ American Architect 132 (5 November 1927): 583-588.

Gulf Building
710 Main St., Houston
1929, Kenneth Franzheim (New York), Alfred C. Finn, and J. E. R. Carpenter (New York)
“The Gulf Building, Houston, Texas, Alfred C. Finn and Franzheim & Carpenter, Architects,” Southern Architect and Building News 56 (March 1930): 64.

Heywood Nelms House
3921 Sleepyhollow Court, Houston
1929, Frank J. Forster (New York)
“House of Haywood Nelms, Houston, Texas, Frank J. Forster, Architect,” Architecture 64 (December 1931): 349-356; Frank J. Forster, Country Houses: The Work of Frank J. Forster AIA. New York: W. Helburn, Inc., 1931, pp. 116-137.

Stella Cook Maverick House
401 Torcido Dr., Alamo Heights
1929, George Washington Smith (Montecito)

Caed Mile Failte, John Henry Phelan House
2810 Calder Ave.., Beaumont
1929, Owen James Southwell (Atlanta) and Livesay & Wiedemann
Dorothy M. Hoskins, “’A Hundred Thousand Welcomes:’ The Home of Mr. and Mrs. John Henry Phelan in Beaumont.” Houston Gargoyle 3 (2 November 1930): 17-18; Bradley Brooks, “Owen J. T. Southwell, Architect, and the John Henry Phelan House.” Texas Gulf Historical and Biographical Record 35 (November 1999): 3-17.

Alamo National Bank Building
154 E. Commerce St., San Antonio
1929, Graham, Anderson, Probst & White (Chicago)
“Alamo National Bank,” Southern Architect and Building News 55 (June 1929): 47; Sally A. Kitt Chappell, Architecture and Planning of Graham, Anderson, Probst & White, 1912-1936: Transforming Tradition, Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1992, pp. 210-211.

J. B. Robertson House
303 Devine Rd., Olmos Park
1930, William McKnight Bowman (New York)
“A Venetian Villa in Our Southwest.” House and Garden 57 (February 1930): 102-105; Edmund B. Gilchrist, “A Venetian Villa in Texas.” Architectural Forum 52 (April 1930): 537-569.

U. S. Custom House (University of Texas Medical Branch)
1700 Strand, Galveston
1933, Bottomley, Wagner & White (New York)

U. S. Courthouse
500 block W. 10th St., Fort Worth
1933, W. G. Clarkson Co. with Paul Philippe Cret (Philadelphia)
Kenneth Reid, “Paul Philippe Cret: Master of Design,” Pencil Points 19 (October 1938): 617; Theo B. White, Paul Philippe Cret: Architect and Teacher, introduction by John F. Harbeson, Philadelphia: The Art Alliance Press, 1973, plate 72.

Walter W. Fisher House
3509 Hampton Rd., Austin
1935, Harry Howe Bentley (Chicago)

Magnolia Lounge
Texas Centennial Exposition, Fair Park, Dallas
1936, William Lescaze (New York)
“Thirteen Years of Fair Building Reviewed in Current Exhibition,” Architectural Record 80 (July 1936): 3.

Anderson Hall
Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View
193_, Louis Edwin Fry (Washington, DC)

George Kraigher House
525 Paredes Line Rd., Brownsville
1937, Richard J. Neutra (Los Angeles)
2008, restoration
“Open-Planned, Window-Walled House in the Southwest,” Architectural Record 85 (May 1939): 111, and Thomas S. Hines, Richard Neutra and the Search for Modern Architecture: A Biography and History, New York: Oxford University Press, 1982; Catherine Gavin, “A Daring Rescue,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 77 (Winter 2009): 24-29.

U. S. Post Office and Court House
615 E. Houston St., San Antonio
1937, Ralph H. Cameron with Paul Philippe Cret (Philadelphia)

Administration Building and Library
University of Texas, Austin
1937, Paul P. Cret (Philadelphia)
Kenneth Reid, “Paul Philippe Cret: Master of Design,” Pencil Points 19 (October 1938): 612-616; Theo B. White, Paul Philippe Cret: Architect and Teacher, Introduction by John F. Harbeson, Philadelphia: The Art Alliance Press, 1973, plates 59-60; Carol McMichael, Paul Cret at Texas: Architectural Drawings and the Image of the University in the 1930s, Austin: The Archer M. Huntington Art Gallery, 1983.

Dan J. Holland House, Motohome
117 Crow St., Baytown
1937, Holden, McLaughlin & Associates (New York)
Ben Koush, “Home Sweet Motohome: A Prefab Modern Landmark,” Cite 55: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston, (Fall 2002): 11.

William S. Howell, Jr., House
1700 Booneville Road, Bryan (demolished)
1938, Delano & Aldrich (New York) with Atkinson & Sanders

Fondren Library
Southern Methodist University, Dallas
1940, Paul P. Cret (New York) with DeWitt & Washburn
“With Record Readers: Record Poll in Dallas Produces Wide Variety of Choices,” Architectural Record 88 (August 1940): 16, 18.

Rancho Encinal, E. L. DeGolyer House
8525 Garland Rd., Dallas
1940, H. Denman Schutt and Burton A. Scott (Los Angeles)
“With Record Readers: Record Poll in Dallas Produces Wide Variety of Choices.” Architectural Record 88 (August 1940): 16, 18; “The Dallas Home of Mr. and Mrs. E. L. De Golyer.” Antiques 53 (June 1948): 429-430; “Every Room of Mr. and Mrs. Everette Lee De Golyer’s House Overlooks a Garden.” House and Garden 87 (March 1950): 102-105.

Pio Crespi House
5535 Walnut Hill Lane, Dallas
1941, Treanor & Fatio (Palm Beach)
Derro Evans, “Dallas: Villa Fiorenza.” Texas Homes 9 (September 1985): 64-71.

70 houses for Dow Chemical Company
W. 4th and W. Broad Sts. between Mesquite and Yaupon Sts., Freeport
1941, Alden B. Dow (Midland, MI)
“Freeport, Texas,” Architectural Record 91 (April 1942): 56-61; Ben Koush, “Dow By the Sea,” Cite 61: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Summer 2004): 24-27.

Lake Jackson Town Plan, Town Center Plan, and Commercial Building
101-121 South Parking Place, Lake Jackson
1941-43, Alden B. Dow (Midland MI)
Sidney K. Robinson, The Architecture of Alden B. Dow, Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1983, pp. 125-126, 130; Ben Koush, “Dow By the Sea,” Cite 61: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston, (Summer 2004): 24-27.

Avion Village
Avion Parkway and Belt Line Rd., Grand Prairie
1942, Richard Neutra (Los Angeles) and DeWitt & Swank
Richard J. Neutra, “Peace Can Learn From War’s Forced Changes,” Pencil Points 23 (November 1942): 28-29; Muriel Quest McCarthy, David R. Williams: Pioneer Architect, foreword by O’Neil Ford, introduction by Arch Swank, Dallas: Southern Methodist University Press, 1984, pp. 136-139; Willis Winters, “Avion Village: Enduring Community of Values,” Texas Architect 38 (May-June 1988), 24-29; Kristin M. Szylvian, “Avion Village: Texas’ World War II Housing Laboratory,” Legacies: A History Journal for Dallas and North Texas 4 (Fall 1992), 28-34.

First Presbyterian Church
5300 Main Blvd. Houston
1949, Hobart Upjohn (New York) and Maurice J. Sullivan

Honolulu Oil Corp. Building
204 W. Illinois Ave. and N. Lorraine St., Midland
1949, John Ekin Dinwiddie and Richard Maxwell (San Francisco)
“Midland, Texas, John Ekin Dinwiddie, Architect, Richard Maxwell, Associate,” Progressive Architecture 31 (June 1950): 72-76.

Sam Maceo House
43 Cedar Lawn Circle, Galveston
1950, Williams, Williams & Williams (Palm Springs)

First Baptist Church
2201 Broadway, Lubbock
1951, Butler & Brasher, Eggers & Higgins (New York), consulting architects

Armstrong Browning Library
Baylor University, Waco
1951, Eggers & Higgins (New York) with Wyatt C. Hedrick (Fort Worth)

Charles P. McGaha House
100 Sarasue Lane, Wichita Falls (demolished)
1951, Paul Laszlo (Beverly Hills)
“Residence of Charles P. McGaha, Wichita Falls, Texas, Designed by Paul Laszlo, Beverly Hills, California,” Architectural Digest 13 (No. 2) 127-146.

John de Menil House
3363 San Felipe Rd., Houston
1951, Philip Johnson Associates (New York) with Cowell & Neuhaus
“Art Collection and Home of the John de Menils in Houston’s River Oaks.” Interiors 123 (November 1963): 84-91; James Johnson Sweeney, “Collectors’ Home,” Vogue 147 (1 April 1967): 184-191; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000.; and Stover, Jenkins, and David Mohney. The Houses of Philip Johnson. Afterword by Neil Levine. Photographs by Steven Brooke. New York: Abbeville Press Publishers, 2001, pp. 55-59; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 46-47; Bruce C. Webb, “Menil House,” Texas Architect 57 (September-October 2007): 56-59; Bruce C. Webb, “Living Modern in Mid-Century Houston: Conserving the Menil House,” Journal of Architectural Education 62 (September 2008): 11-19; Martin Filler, “The Real Menil,” Antiques 174 (September 2008): 78-85.

Mayer & Schmidt (J. M. Dyer Co.)
320 S. Broadway, Tyler
1952, Victor Gruen (Los Angeles)
“The Store That Cars Built,” Architectural Forum 96 (May 1952): 132-133.

Sam Wiener House
4808 Westridge, Fort Worth
1952, Edward Larrabee Barnes (New York)
Built in USA: Postwar Architecture, edited by Henry-Russell Hitchcock and Arthur Drexler, New York: The Museum of Modern Art, 1952, pp. 44-45; “A Sweeping Flat Roof Unifies This Large and Complex Plan,” House and Home 7 (June 1955): 116-121.

David J. Stone House
1905 Vicksburg Ave., Lubbock
c. 1952, Cliff May, designer; Thomas Church & Associates, landscape arch.
Western Ranch Houses by Cliff May, ed. by Paul C. Johnson, Santa Monica: Hennessey & Ingalls, 1997, pp. 80-87.

Republic National Bank Building
350 N. Ervay St., Dallas
1954, Harrison & Abramovitz (New York) with Gill & Harrell
“New Thinking on Curtain Walls and Window Sizes for New Dallas Skyscraper and Bank Building by Designer of UN Building,” Architectural Forum 99 (September 1953): 107-111; “Structure, Enclosure, Equipment, Economics and the Architect’s Talents: Republic National Bank of Dallas, Texas,” Architectural Record 115 (April 1954): 186-194; “A New High in the Skyline of Dallas,” Architectural Record 117 (February 1955): 147-154.

Fort Worth Art Center (altered)
1309 Montgomery St.
1954, W. G. Clarkson Co. and A. George King with Herbert Bayer (Aspen) and Gordon Chadwick
“A Community Center for the Arts,” Progressive Architecture 34 (August 1953): 13-14; “Art Museum on the Plains,” Architectural Forum 102 (January 1955): 25.

William L. Thaxton House
12020 Tall Oaks Rd., Bunker Hill Village
1954, Frank Lloyd Wright (Spring Green WI)
“Three New Houses by Frank Lloyd Wright,” House and Home 14 (August 1958): 101, 106-107;William Allin Storrer, The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006, p. 412.

Statler Hilton Hotel
1914 Commerce St., Dallas
1956, William B. Tabler (New York)
“New Shape and Structure,” Architectural Forum 100 (June 1954): 158-163; “The Dallas Statler Hilton: Studied Economy,” Architectural Forum 104 (April 1956): 128-131; “Bill Tabler’s Hotel Boom,” Architectural Forum 107 (July 1957): 114-121; Motels, Hotels, Restaurants and Bars New York: F. W. Dodge Corp., 1960, pp. 212-217.

Church of the Heavenly Rest
602 Meander, Abilene
1956, Philip Hubert Frohman (Washington, D. C.)

Medical Towers Building
1709 Dryden St., Houston
1956, Golemon & Rolfe with Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (New York)
“The Medical Towers,” Progressive Architecture 38 (June 1957): 192-195; Kevin Alter, “SOM in Houston,” Cite 40: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston Winter 1997-1998, pp. 34-37.

Josephine and Bruno Graf House
5423 Park Lane, Dallas
1957, Edward Durell Stone (New York)
“A Residence in Dallas, Texas,” Architectural Record 122 (July 1957): 160-163; “Contrast in Texas,” Architectural Forum 109 (July 1958): 82-87; Curtis Besinger, “The Traditional Graces Give Elegance to This New Environment.” House Beautiful 101 (November 1959): 226-237; Michael Malone, “Oak Court,” Texas Architect 58 (September-October 2008): 82-85.

L. Hernley McCullough House
2301 Farington Rd., Wichita Falls (demolished)
1957, Bruce Goff (Bartlesville)
David Gilson DeLong, The Architecture of Bruce Goff: Buildings and Projects, 1916-1974 New York: Garland Publishing Co., 1977, pp. 314-315 and figures 331-332.

Snyder National Bank Building
1715 25th St., Snyder
1957, Jones & Emmons (Los Angeles)
“Bank by A. Quincy Jones and Frederick E. Emmons, Architects,” Arts and Architecture 75 (August 1958): 22-23.

Southland Center
400 N. Olive St., Dallas
1958, Welton Becket & Associates (Los Angeles) and Mark Lemmon
“Office Building and Hotel Combined: Southland Center, Dallas, Texas,” Architectural Record 126 (August 1959): 141-146; Richard A. Miller, “Blockbuster in Dallas,” Architectural Forum 111 (August 1959): 94-101; “The Sheraton Dallas,” Interiors 118 (June 1959): 68-75; Motels, Hotels, Restaurants and Bars New York: F. W. Dodge Corp., 1960, pp. 193-198; “Building: The New Face of Texas,” Fortune 64 (October 1961): 128-135.

John A. Gillin House
9400 Rockbrook Dr., Dallas
1950-58, Frank Lloyd Wright
William Allin Storrer, The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006, pp. 358-359.

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
1001 Bissonnet Ave., Houston
1958, 1974, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe (Chicago)
“Museum Annex, Mies van der Rohe, Architect,” Arts and Architecture 76 (July 1959): 10-11; “Renovation by Devouring: Houston’s Classic Museum is Enlarged by a New ‘Wing” of Considerably Different Classic Cast,” Architectural Forum 112 (January 1960): 128-129; “Building: The New Face of Texas,” Fortune 64 (October 1961): 128-135; Michael Browne, The New Museum: Architecture and Display, New York” Frederick A. Praeger Inc., 1965, pp. 136-137; Peter C. Papademetriou, “Varied Reflections in Houston,” Progressive Architecture 56 (March 1975): 52-56.

University of St. Thomas
3812-3910 Yoakum Blvd., Houston
1957-59, Philip Johnson Associates (New York) with Bolton & Barnstone
“Campus Architecture: The University of St. Thomas, Houston,” Architectural Record 122 (August 1957): 138-139, 142-143; John M. Jacobus, Jr. Philip Johnson, Makers of Contemporary Architecture, New York: George Braziller, 1962; “First Units in the Fabric of a Closed Campus,” Architectural Record 126 (September 1959): 180-182; “Processional Elements in Houston,” Architectural Record 137 (June 1965): 159; Philip Johnson, Philip Johnson Architecture 1949-1965, introduction by Henry-Russell Hitchcock, New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston, 1966; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000.; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 78-79; Michelangelo Sabatino, “Cracking the Egg: The Transformation of the University of St. Thomas Campus,” Cite 73: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Winter 2008): 10-17.

Dallas Theater Center
3636 Turtle Creek Blvd., Dallas
1959, Frank Lloyd Wright
“Dallas Theater,” Architectural Record 1233 (May 1958): 168-169; “Christmas Present for Dallas: A Theater by Wright,” Progressive Architecture 40 (December 1959) 79; “A Theatre by Wright,” Architectural Record 127 (March 1960): 161-166; “Building: The New Face of Texas,” Fortune 64 (October 1961): 128-135; William Allin Storrer, The Frank Lloyd Wright Companion. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2006, p. 424.

Durst-Gee House
323 Tynebrook Lane, Piney Point Village
1960, Bruce Goff (Bartlesville) and Joseph Krakower
“Goff on Goff: Durst House, Houston, Texas,” Progressive Architecture 43 (December 1962): 116; David Gilson DeLong, The Architecture of Bruce Goff: Buildings and Projects, 1916-1974 New York: Garland Publishing Co., 1977, pp. 351-352 and figures 391-394.

First National Bank Building
500 W. 7th S., Fort Worth
1960, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (New York) and Preston M. Geren
“Building: The New Face of Texas,” Fortune 64 (October 1961): 128-135; “First National Bank, Fort Worth,” Texas Architect 12 (March 1962): 12-15.

First City National Bank Building
1001 Main St, Houston
1961, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (New York) with Wilson, Morris, Crain & Anderson
“Tripartite Scheme for Bank, Office Building, and Garage,” Architectural Record 129 (April 1961): 155-164; “Building: The New Face of Texas,” Fortune 64 (October 1961): 128-135. Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. The Architecture of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1950-1962. Introduction by Henry-Russell Hitchcock. Text by Ernst Danz. Translation by Ernst van Haagen and Antje Pehnt. New York: Praeger Publishers, 1963, pp. 152-157; Carol Herselle Krinsky, Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, New York and Cambridge: Architectural History Foundation and MIT Press, 1988, pp. 70-72; Kevin Alter, “SOM in Houston,” Cite 40: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston Winter 1997-1998, pp. 34-37.

Amon Carter Museum
3501 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth (altered)
1961, Philip Johnson (New York) and Joseph R. Pelich
William H. Jordy, “The Mies-less Johnson,” Architectural Forum 111 (September 1959): 117; “Portico on a Plaza,” Architectural Forum 114 (March 1961): 86-89; Russell Lynes, “Everything’s Up to Date in Texas…But Me,” Harper’s Magazine (May 1961): 38-42; “Building: The New Face of Texas,” Fortune 64 (October 1961): 129-135; “Architectural Details 3. Philip Johnson: Amon Carter Museum of Western Art, 1961,” Architectural Record 135 (April 1964): 144-145; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000.; David Dillon, “Amon Carter Museum, Fort Worth, Texas,” Architectural Record 189 (November 2001): 146-149; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 92-93.

Andrews High School
1400 block NW Avenue K, Andrews
1960, Reid, Rockwell, Barnwell & Tarics (San Francisco)
John Lyon Reid, ”Two Loft Schools: New Instruments of Education,” Architectural Record 127 (February 1960): 196-202; John Lyon Reid, “The Acoustics of the Andrews High School,” Architectural Record 132 (July 1962): 151-153; Special School: 1. A Flexible Environment for Learning,” Architectural Record 133 (May 1963): 168-173.

Neiman-Marcus
7000 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth (altered)
1962, Edward Larrabee Barnes (New York) and Preston M. Geren
“Quiet Architecture of Edward Larrabee Barnes: Compact Shopping Center,” Architectural Record 130 (October 1961): 132; “White on White: New Texas Shopping Center is a Village of Cool Cubes,” Architectural Forum 113 (July 1963): 96-99. “A Dallas Institution Captures Rival Fort Worth,” Interiors 123 (August 1963): 58-67; Barbara Koerble, “Buy Design: Stanley Marcus on the Architecture of Merchandising,” Cite 35, The Architecture and Design Review of Houston, Fall 1996, 28-30.

Congregation Mount Sinai Temple
4408 N. Stanton St., El Paso
1962, Sidney H. Eisenshtat & Associates (Beverly Hills) and Carroll & Daeuble Associates
“El Paso-Ciudad Juárez: The International City,” Texas Architect 15 (October 1965): front cover.

Humble Building
800 Bell Ave., Houston
1963, Welton Becket & Associates (Los Angeles) with Golemon & Rolfe and George Pierce-Abel B. Pierce
“Design Against Sun and Glare,” Architectural Record 136 (October 1963): 173-178; “Houston’s Petroleum Club,” Interiors 123 (September 1963): 88-95; William Dudley Hunt, Jr., Total Design: Architecture of Welton Becket and Associates, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1972, pp. 164-217.

Tenneco Building
1010 Milam St., Houston
1963, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (San Francisco)
“In Texas the Glass Box Goes 3-D,” Architectural Forum 119 (September 1963): 124-131; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill. The Architecture of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1963-1973. Introduction by Arthur Drexler. Text by Axel Menges. New York: Architectural Book Publishing Company, 1974, pp. 124-127.

T.L.L. Temple Library
300 Park St., Diboll
1964, Desmond-Miremont-Gasaway (New Orleans)

H. C. Beck, Jr., House
10210 Strait Lane, Dallas
1964, Philip Johnson (New York)
Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas, Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000.; Jenkins Stover and David Mohney. The Houses of Philip Johnson. Afterword by Neil Levine. Photographs by Steven Brooke. New York: Abbeville Press Publishers, 2001, pp. 190-195; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 106-107.

Neiman-Marcus Northpark
Boedecker St. and Northwest Highway, Dallas
1965, Eero Saarinen & Associates (New Haven)
“’World’s Largest’ Shopping Center Opens,” Architectural Record 138 (December 1965): 43; “Northpark Regional Shopping Center” Architectural Record 139 (April 1966): 150-159; Eleanor Le Maire Creates a Euphoric Atmosphere for Shopping,” Interiors 125 (December 1965): 92-101; Kevin Roche, Kevin Roche, introduction by Francesco Dal Co, Milan: Electa Editrice, 1985, pp. 94-95; Barbara Koerble, “Buy Design: Stanley Marcus on the Architecture of Merchandising,” Cite 35, The Architecture and Design Review of Houston, Fall 1996, 28-30.

Great Southern Life Insurance Co. Building
3121 Buffalo Speedway, Houston (demolished)
1965, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (New York) and Wilson, Morris, Crain & Anderson
“Textured Concrete and Air Ducts Mesh Like a Chinese Puzzle,” Engineering News-Record 173 (22 October 1964): 30-32; Kevin Alter, “SOM in Houston,” Cite 40: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston Winter 1997-1998, pp. 34-37.

One Main Place
1201 Main St., Dallas
1968, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (New York) with Harwood K. Smith & Partners
“Ten Acre Superblock Planned for Dallas,” Architectural Record 136 (July 1964): 14; “Dallas Downtown Project Approaches Reality,” Progressive Architecture 45 (July 1964): 70-71; “Multi-Level Concourse Connects Multiple Uses,” Architectural record 140 (November 1966): 162-165.

Alley Theater
615 Texas Ave., Houston\
1968, Ulrich Franzen & Associates (New York) with MacKie & Kamrath
“Alley: A Director’s Dream,” Progressive Architecture 46 (October 1965): 172-173; “The Search for Appropriate Form,” Architectural Record 139 (May 1966): 136-137; John Morris Dixon, “Houston’s Alley Theater,” Architectural Forum 130 (March 1969): 30-39; Peter Blake, The Architecture of Ulrich Franzen: Selected Works, foreword by George Weissman, Basel: Birkhäuser, 1999, pp. 102-107.

One Brookhollow Plaza
Stemmons Freeway and Mockingbird Lane, Dallas
1969, Paul Rudolph (New York) and Harwood K. Smith & Partners
“Two Projects by Paul Rudolph,” Architectural Record 151 (February 1972): 87, 94-96; Mark Gunderson, “Rudolph and Texas,” Texas Architect 48 (May-June 1998): 50-52.

Galleria and Neiman-Marcus
5015 Westheimer Rd., Houston
1971 and 1969, Hellmuth Obata & Kassabaum (St. Louis) and Neuhaus & Taylor
“Galleria Post Oak,” Architectural Record 146 (July 1969): 143-150; “Supermall,” Architectural Forum 136 (April 1972): 30-33; Jonathan King and William T. Cannady, “Galleria,” Architectural Design 43 (November 1973): 695-697; Walter McQuade, Architecture in the Real World: The Work of Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1983, pp. 148-153; Barbara Koerble, “Buy Design: Stanley Marcus on the Architecture of Merchandising,” Cite 35, The Architecture and Design Review of Houston, Fall 1996, 28-30; Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum, Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum: Selected and Current Works, introduction by Martin Pawley, Mulgrave: The Image Publishing Co., 1998, pp. 14-15; Bruce C. Webb, “City Under Glass,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 65 (Winter 2005): 20-23.

Anne Burnett Tandy House
1400 Shady Oaks Lane, Westover Hills
1970, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York)
“A Great House for Two or Two Hundred,” House and Garden (November 1970): 114-121.

John F. Kennedy Memorial
600 block Market St., Dallas
1970, Philip Johnson (New York)
Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Betsy Del Monte, “JFK Memorial Restored,” Texas Architect 50 (September-October 2000): 16-17; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 138-139.

Lyndon B. Johnson Presidential Library
University of Texas, Austin
1970, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (New York) with Brooks, Barr, Graber & White
Mildred F. Schmertz, “In Praise of a Monument to Lyndon B. Johnson,” Architectural Record 150 (November 1971): 113-120; Carol Herselle Krinsky, Gordon Bunshaft of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, New York and Cambridge: Architectural History Foundation and MIT Press, 1988, pp. 284-287.

Sid W. Richardson Physical Science Building
Bowie St. and S. University Dr., Texas Christian University, Fort Worth
1971, Paul Rudolph (New York) and Preston M. Geren & Associates
“Two Projects by Paul Rudolph,” Architectural Record 151 (February 1972): 87, 94-96; Mark Gunderson, “Rudolph and Texas,” Texas Architect 48 (May-June 1998): 50-52.

Arthur Temple Memorial Library (originally T. L. L. Temple Library)
Timberland Hwy., Pineland
1971, Desmond-Miremont-Gasaway (New Orleans)

One Shell Plaza
910 Louisiana St., Houston
1971, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (Chicago) and Wilson, Morris, Crain & Anderson
Jonathan King and William T. Cannady, “One Shell Plaza, Tallest Building West of the Mississippi,” Architectural Design 42 (January 1972): 22-23 “Supershell,” Architectural Forum 136 (April 1972): 26-29; Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, The Architecture of Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, 1963-1973. Introduction by Arthur Drexler, Text by Axel Menges, New York: Architectural Book Publishing Company, 1974, pp. 174-177; Bruce Graham, Bruce Graham of SOM, introduction by Stanley Tigerman, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1989, pp. 52-55; Kevin Alter, “SOM in Houston,” Cite 40: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston Winter 1997-1998, pp. 34-37; Nicholas Adams, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill: SOM Since 1936, Milan: Electa, 2007, pp. 248-251.

State National Bank Building
Texas Avenue and N. Kansas Street, El Paso
1971, Charles Luckman Associates (Los Angeles) with Kuykendall, McCombs, Middleton & Staber

The Art Museum of South Texas
1902 N. Shoreline Dr., Corpus Christi (altered)
1972, Johnson/Burgee Architects (New York) with Howard Barnstone and Eugene Aubry (Houston)
“Three New Museums in Texas,” Art in America 60 (September-October 1972): 50-51; Paul Goldberger, “Form and Procession,” Architectural Forum 138 (January-February 1973): 41-45; Alan Lesoff, “An Art Museum for South Texas, 1944-1980,” in Legacy: A History of the Art Museum of South Texas, Corpus Christi: Art Museum of South Texas, 1997, pp. 24-53 Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 142-143.

Kimbell Art Museum
3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth
1972, Louis I. Kahn (Philadelphia) and P. M. Geren & Associates
“The Mind of Louis Kahn,” Architectural Forum 137 (July-August 1972): 55-61; “Kahn’s Museum: An Interview with Richard Brown,” Art in America 60 (September-October 1972): 44-48; John Anderson, “Kahn’s Kimbell: A Building in Praise of Nature and Light,” Interiors 132 (March 1973): 84-91; “Kimbell Art Museum, Fort Worth, Texas,” American Institute of Architects Journal 63 (May 1975): 38-39; Marshall Meyers, “Master of Light,” American Institute of Architects Journal 68 (September 1979): 60-62; Lawrence W. Speck, “Evaluation: The Kimbell Art Museum,” American Institute of Architects Journal 71 (August 1982): 36-43; In Pursuit of Quality: The Kimbell Art Museum: An Illustrated History of the Art and Architecture, Fort Worth: Kimbell Art Museum, 1987; Louis I. Kahn, Light is the Theme: Louis I. Kahn and the Kimbell Art Museum. Fort Worth: Kimbell Art Foundation, 1988; Patricia Cummings Loud, The Art Museums of Louis I. Kahn, Foreword by Mitchell P. Mezzatesta, Durham: Duke University Press and the Duke University Museum of Art, 1989; Michael Benedikt. Deconstructing the Kimbell: An Essay on Meaning and Architecture. New York: Sites Books, 1991; Michael Brawne, The Kimbell Art Museum: Louis I. Kahn. London: Phaidon, 1992; “Kimbell Art Museum is Honored as the ‘Timeless’ Work of a Master,” Architectural Record 186 (May 1998): 130-131; Louis I. Kahn, Louis I. Kahn: The Construction of the Kimbell Art Museum. Milan: Skira, 1999.

Fort Worth City Hall
10th and Jennings, Fort Worth
1972, Edward Durell Stone & Associates (New York) and P. M. Geren & Associates

Contemporary Arts Museum
5216 Montrose Boulevard, Houston
1972, Gunnar Birkerts & Associates (Ann Arbor) with Charles Tapley Associates
“Contemporary Arts Museum, Houston, Texas,” Architectural Record 150 (October 1971): 110; Jan Van Der Marck, “Houston’s ‘Clean Machine:’ the Contemporary Arts Museum,” Art in America 60 (September-October 1972): 50-51; Peter C. Papademetriou, “Varied Reflections in Houston,” Progressive Architecture 56 (March 1975): 52-56; William Marlin, Gunnar Birkerts & Associates, edited and photos by Yukio Futagawa, Tokyo: ADA Edita, 1982, pp. 144-147; Kay Kaiser, The Architecture of Gunnar Birkerts, Washington DC: American Institute of Architects Press, 2006, p. 82.

Amarillo Museum of Art
2200 S. Van Buren Street
Amarillo
1972, Edward Durell Stone & Associates (New York)
“Three New Museums in Texas,” Art in America 60 (September-October 1972): 50-51.

House
Dallas
1973, Booth, Nagle & Hartray (Chicago)
“Award of Merit,” Housing 54 (August 1978): 81; James Nagle and Kathleen Nagle, Houses: The Architecture of Nagle Hartray Danker Kagan McKay Penney, New York: Edizioni Press, 2005, pp. 20-21.

Post Oak Central
1980-2000 Post Oak Boulevard, Houston
1973-81, Johnson/Burgee Architects (New York), S. I. Morris Associates, and Richard Fitzgerald & Partners
Peter Papademetriou, “Deco-rating Houston’s Skyline,” Progressive Architecture 58 (January 1977): 32; Philip Johnson, Johnson/Burgee: Architecture, text by Nory Miller, photographs by Richard Payne, New York: Random House, 1979, pp. 64-67; Paul Goldberger, The Skyscraper New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982, p. 126 Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 168-171.

Dallas Fort Worth International Airport
International Parkway, DFW Airport
1974, Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum (St, Louis) and Brodsky, Hopf & Adler (New York)
Cathy Beal Allgeier, “The Someplace Airport,” Interiors 136 (January 1977): 86-91; John Pastier, “Dallas-Fort Worth: Metroplex and Mega-Airport,” American Institute of Architects Journal 63 (March 1978): 60-69; Walter McQuade, Architecture in the Real World: The Work of Hellmuth, Obata & Kassabaum, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Inc., 1983, pp. 126-129; Mary Anne Norman and James Smallwood, “Founding the Dallas-Fort Worth Regional Airport: The Dallas Perspective,” East Texas Historical Journal 25 (2: 1987), 80-90.

Fort Worth National Bank Building (altered)
500 Throckmorton St., Fort Worth
1974, John Portman & Associates (Atlanta) and Preston M. Geren & Associates
Olga Gueft, “Portman’s Most Intemnsively Shared Space,” Intreriors 134 (November 1974): 96-103; John Portman and Jonathan Barnett, The Architect as Developer, New York: McGraw-Hill Book Co., 1976.

Bass House
Westover Hills
1974, Paul Rudolph (New York)
Mildred Schmertz, “Texas Tour de Force,” House & Garden 163 (December 1991): 164-173; Mark Gunderson, “Rudolph and Texas,” Texas Architect 48 (May-June 1998): 50-52; Roberto de Alba, Paul Rudolph: The Late Work, introduction by Robert Bruegmann, New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2003, pp. 56-63.

Two Houston Center
909 Fannin St., Houston
1974, William L. Pereira Associates (Los Angeles) and Pierce Goodwin Flanagan
William T. Cannady, “TET-Center, Houston,” Architectural Design 41(April 1971): 217-218.

Fort Worth Water Gardens
14th and Commerce, Fort Worth
1974, Johnson/Burgee (New York)
Peter C. Papademetriou, “Big Splash in Fort Worth,” Progressive Architecture 56 (January 1975): 22-23; Philip Johnson, Johnson/Burgee: Architecture, text by Nory Miller, photographs by Richard Payne, New York: Random House, 1979, pp. 44-51; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 164-165.

The Woodlands Information Center
2120 Buckthorne Place, The Woodlands
1975, Bennie M. González (Scottsdale)
Ian L. McHarg and Jonathan Sutton, “Ecological Plumbing for the Texas Coastal Plain,” Landscape Architecture 75 (January 1975): 78-89; “Visitors Center for a New Town,” Architectural Record 159 (February 1976): 101-106.

Best Products Co. Indeterminate Façade (altered)
10765 Kingspoint Road, Houston
1975, SITE (New York)
SITE, SITE: Architecture as Art, essays by Pierre Restany and Bruno Zevi, New York: St. Martin’s Press, 1980, pp. 25-26, 33, 42-49; SITE, Tokyo: Architecture and urbanism Publishing Co., 1986, pp. 34-35; James Wines and SITE: Architecture dans le contexte, ed. by Marie-Ange Brayer, Orléans: Musée des Beaux-Arts d’Orléans, 2002, pp. 60-61; SITE, SITE: Identity in Density, Mulgrave: The Images Publishing Corp., 2005, pp. 40-45.

Pennzoil Place
711 Louisiana Street, Houston
1976, Johnson/Burgee (New York) and S. I. Morris Associates
Paul Goldberger, “Form and Procession,” Architectural Forum 138 (January-February 1973): 37-39; Paul Goldberger, “High Design at a Profit,” New York Times Magazine 14 November 1976, pp. 76-79; William Marlin, “Pennzoil Place,” Architectural Record 160 (November 1976): 101-110; Ada Louise Huxtable, Kicked a Building Lately? New York: Quadrangle/New York Times Book Co., 1976, pp. 67-71; “Pennzoil Place, Houston,” Journal of the American Institute of Architects 66 (May 1977): 48-49; “Project Pennzoil,” Interior Design 48 (June 1977): 134-145; Peter Papademetriou, “Is ‘Wow!’ Enough?” Progressive Architecture 58 (August 1977): 66-72; Philip Johnson, Johnson/Burgee: Architecture, text by Nory Miller, photographs by Richard Payne, New York: Random House, 1979, pp. 44-51; Paul Goldberger, The Skyscraper New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982, pp. 124-126; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 174-179.

Thanks-Giving Square
Pacific Street and N. Ervay Street
1977, Johnson/Burgee (New York)
Jane Sumner, “The Park That Peter Built,” D: The Magazine of Dallas 4 (November 1977): 108-111; Philip Johnson, Johnson/Burgee: Architecture, text by Nory Miller, photographs by Richard Payne, New York: Random House, 1979, pp. 44-51; Paul Goldberger, The Skyscraper New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982, pp. 94-101; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 184-187.

Dallas City Hall
1400-1500 blocks Young Street, Dallas
1978, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York) and Harper & Kemp
John Pastier, “Bold Image of a City’s Symbol of the Future,” Journal of the American Institute of Architects 67 (Mid-May 1978): 112-117; “Dallas City Hall,” Architectural Review 164 (November 1978): 300-301; Peter C. Papademetriou, “Angling for a Civic Monument,” Progressive Architecture 60 (May 1979): 102-105; Carter Wiseman, I. M. Pei: A Profile in American Architecture, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Publishers, 1990, pp. 120-137; I. M. Pei: Complete Works, ed. by Philip Jodido, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2008, pp. 118-123.

Reunion Place
Houston and Young, Dallas
1978, Welton Becket & Associates (Los Angeles)
Janet Nairn, “Shimmering Success for Dallas Hotel,” Architectural Record 164 (October 1978): 107-112; “Reunion Hotel, Dallas,” Architectural Review 164 (November 1978): 302-303; Paul Goldberger, The Skyscraper New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982, pp. 122.

Internorth Energy Building
256 North Sam Houston Parkway East, Houston
1978, Gwathmey, Siegel & Associates (New York)
Walter Wagner, “What’s a High-Style Design Firm Like Gwathmey-Siegel Doing Designing Speculative Office Buildings Along Freeways and In Office Campuses?” Architectural Record 162 (December 1977): 108-111.

Damson Energy Building
260 North Sam Houston Parkway East, Houston
1978, Gwathmey, Siegel & Associates (New York)
Walter Wagner, “What’s a High-Style Design Firm Like Gwathmey-Siegel Doing Designing Speculative Office Buildings Along Freeways and In Office Campuses?” Architectural Record 162 (December 1977): 108-111; Charles Gwathmey and Robert Siegel: Buildings and Projects, 1964-1984, ed by Peter Arnell and Ted Bickford, associate ed Ivan Zaknic, New York: Harper & Row Publisher, 1984, pp. 126-127.

Northpoint Building
262 North Sam Houston Parkway East, Houston
1979, Gwathmey, Siegel & Associates (New York)
Walter Wagner, “What’s a High-Style Design Firm Like Gwathmey-Siegel Doing Designing Speculative Office Buildings Along Freeways and In Office Campuses?” Architectural Record 162 (December 1977): 108-111.

One Dallas Centre
350 N. St. Paul Street, Dallas
1979, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York) and Fisher & Spillman
Stanley Abercrombie, “Glass Tower Brought to Life—and Light,” American Institute of Architects Journal 70 (Mid-May 1981): 215-219.

Triangle Pacific Corporation Building
16803 Dallas Parkway, Addison
1980, Gwathmey, Siegel & Associates (New York)
Charles Gwathmey and Robert Siegel: Buildings and Projects, 1964-1984, ed by Peter Arnell and Ted Bickford, associate ed Ivan Zaknic, New York: Harper & Row Publisher, 1984, pp. 200-201; Deborah K. Dietsch, “Triangle Pacific Corporation, Dallas, Texas,” Architectural Record 173 (July 1985): 106-107.

François de Menil House alterations and additions
19 Crestwood Dr., Houston
1980, Gwathmey Siegel & Associates (New York)
Jane Nisselson, “The Surprise of Color: New Dimension in a Classic Design,” House & Garden, 153 (April 1981): 162-167; “Gwathmey Siegel & Associates, Houston Residence, Houston, Texas,” GA Houses 11, pp. 40-45; Charles Gwathmey and Robert Siegel: Buildings and Projects, 1964-1984, ed by Peter Arnell and Ted Bickford, associate ed Ivan Zaknic, New York: Harper & Row Publisher, 1984, pp. 204-207.

Amax Petroleum Building
1300 West Sam Houston Tollway, Houston
1980, Gwathmey, Siegel & Associates (New York)

First International Plaza
1100 Louisiana Street, Houston
1980, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (San Francisco) and 3D/International
Janet Nairn, “Skidmore, Owings & Merrill: New Directions in High-Rise Design,” Architectural Record 169 (March 1981): 114-119; “Instant Image,” Interior Design 52 (June 1981): 198-203; Albert Bush-Brown, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill: Architecture and Urbanism, 1978-1983, New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1984, pp. 196-199.

One West Loop Plaza
2425 West Loop South, Houston
1980, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York) and Richard Fitzgerald & Partners

Texas Commerce Tower in United Energy Plaza
600 Travis Street, Houston
1981, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York) and 3D/International
Paul Goldberger, The Skyscraper New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982, pp. 142-143; “I. M. Pei & Partners: Texas Commerce Tower/United Energy Plaza, Houston, Texas, Design: 1978; Construction: 1978-1982,” GA Document 12 (January 1985): 88-97; I. M. Pei: Complete Works, ed. by Philip Jodido, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2008, pp. 172-175.

Brochstein Wing, Anderson Hall
Rice University, Houston
1981, James Stirling, Michael Wilford & Associates (London) and Ambrose/McEnany
Peter C. Papademetriou, “Stirling in Another Context: School of Architecture Addition, Rice University, Houston, Texas,” Progressive Architecture 62 (December 1981): 53-59; David Gebhard, “Critique,” Progressive Architecture 62 (December 1981): 60-61; Michael sorkin, “Anderson Hall Expansion, School of Architecture, Rice University,” Arts and Architecture 1 (Winter 1981): 47-49; Larry Paul Fuller, “Stirling at Rice: A Study in Contextualism,” Texas Architect 32 (January-February 1982): 54-56; Peter C. Papademetriou, “Stirling at Rice: School of Architecture, Rice University, Houston, Texas,” Architectural Review 171 (February 1982): 50-67; Peter C. Papademetriou and Paul Goldberger, “School of Architecture, Rice University, Houston, Texas,” GA Documents 5 (1982): 50-71; Peter Arnell and Ted Bickford, James Stirling Buildings and Projects: James Stirling Michael Wilford, Introduction by Colin Rowe, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1984.

J. M. Moudy Building for Fine Arts Communications
Texas Christian University, Fort Worth
1981, Kevin Roche-John Dinkeloo & Associates (Hamden CT)
Walter Wagner, “A Strong New Gateway to a College Campus,” Architectural Record 170 (November 1982): 110-113; Nory Miller, “Moody Visual Arts and Communications Building, Texas Christian University, Fort Worth, Texas, Design: 1976; Completion: 1982; Kevin Roche, John Dinkeloo & Associates,” GA Documents 9 (February 1984): 64-69; Kevin Roche, Kevin Roche, introduction by Francesco Dal Co, Milan: Electa Editrice, 1985, pp. 210-213.

Don and Sybil Harrington Cancer Center
1500 Wallace Boulevard, Amarillo
1981, Paul Rudolph (New York) and Wilson-Doche
Mark Gunderson, “Rudolph and Texas,” Texas Architect 48 (May-June 1998): 50-52

San Antonio Museum of Art
110 West Jones Avenue, San Antonio
1981, Cambridge Seven Associates (Cambridge) with Martin & Ortega and Chumney, Jones & Kell
“Award: Architectural Design: Cambridge Seven Associates,” Progressive Architecture 60 (January 1979): 74-75; Mildred F. Schmertz, “An Old Brewery Born Again as the San Antonio Museum of Art,” Architectural Record 169 (June 1981): 92-99; Peter C. Papademetriou, “Artistic Ferment in San Antonio,” Progressive Architecture 62 (November 1981): 30, 34; David Dillon, “The Alamo and Other Battles,” Architecture 75 (March 1986): 62-64.

City Center I and II
201 Main Street, Fort Worth
1982, 1984, Paul Rudolph (New York) and 3D/International
“Clustered Columns Play Hide and Seek,” Architectural Record 170 (July 1982): 124-127; David Dillon, “Darth Vader at the O.K. Corral,” American Institute of Architects Journal 72 (November 1983): 66-67’ “From Object to Space: An Interview with Paul Rudolph,” Architectural Record 173 (June 1985): 156-161; Mark Gunderson, “Rudolph and Texas,” Texas Architect 48 (May-June 1998): 50-52; Roberto de Alba, Paul Rudolph: The Late Work, introduction by Robert Bruegmann, New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2003, pp. 104-107.

Holt House
4734 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi
1982, Batey & Mack (San Francisco) and John Wright
“Houses by Batey & Mack,” GA Houses 10 (1982): 114-127; James Coote, “House on Ocean Drive,” Texas Architect 33 (May-June 1983): 50-52; Charles K. Gandee, “Villa on the Bay, Corpus Christi, Texas, by Batey & Mack,” Architectural Record 172 (Mid-May 1984): 96-103.

Texas Commerce Center
601 Travis Street, Houston
1982, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York) and 3D/International

Warwick Post Oak
2001 Post Oak Boulevard, Houston
1982, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York) and Richard Fitzgerald & Associates
“Strength Through Dignity” The Warwick post Oak Hotel in Houston,” Interior Design 54 (August 1983): 190-198.

Four-Leaf Tower
5100 San Felipe Road, Houston
1982, Cesar Pelli & Associates (New Haven), Albert C. Martin & Associates, and Melton Henry Architects
Paul Goldberger, The Skyscraper New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982, p. 148.; Andrea Oppenheimer Dean, “Speaking Softly in Strong Colors,” American Institute of Architects Journal 72 (May 1983): 168-173; “César Pelli & Associates: Four-Leaf Towers and Four-Oaks Place, Houston, Texas, Design: 1979-1980; Construction: 1979-1983,” GA Document 12 (January 1985): 104-108; César Pelli, A+U July 1985 Special Edition, 1985, pp. 110-115; César Pelli, César Pelli: Buildings and Projects, 1965-1990, introduction by Paul Goldberger, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1990, pp. 68-71.

Four Oaks Place
1300-1400 Post Oak Boulevard, Houston
1983, Cesar Pelli & Associates (New Haven) and Melton Henry Architects
Paul Goldberger, The Skyscraper New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982, pp. 124-126; “César Pelli & Associates: Four-Leaf Towers and Four-Oaks Place, Houston, Texas, Design: 1979-1980; Construction: 1979-1983,” GA Document 12 (January 1985): 104-108; César Pelli, A+U July 1985 Special Edition, 1985, pp. 110-115; César Pelli, César Pelli: Buildings and Projects, 1965-1990, introduction by Paul Goldberger, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1990, pp. 68-71.

Park Regency Terrace Residences
2333 Bering Drive, Houston
1983, Venturi, Rauch & Scott Brown (Philadelphia) and McCleary Associates
John Kaliski, “Diagrams of Ritual and Experience: Learning from the Park Regency,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Spring 1983): 8-13.

First City Bank-North Belt Building, Houston
400 North Sam Houston Parkway East
1983, Gwathmey, Siegel & Associates (New York) and Urban Architecture
Charles Gwathmey and Robert Siegel: Buildings and Projects, 1964-1984, ed by Peter Arnell and Ted Bickford, associate ed Ivan Zaknic, New York: Harper & Row Publisher, 1984, pp. 238-239; Deborak K. Dietsch, “First City Bank, Houston, Texas,” Architectural Record 173 (July 1985): 108-111.

RepublicBank Center
700 Louisiana Street, Houston
1983, Johnson/Burgee Architects (New York) and Kendall/Heaton
Paul Goldberger, The Skyscraper New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982, pp. 155-157; John Ferguson, “RepublicBank Houston,” Texas Architect 34 (January-February 1984): 56-60; Pilar Viladas, “Gothic Romance,” Progressive Architecture 65 (February 1984): 86-93; John Pastier, “A Tale of Two Towers,” Architecture 73 (April 1984): 38-43; “John Burgee Architects with Philip Johnson: RepublicBank Center,” GA Document 12 (December 1985): 80-87; Robert A. M. Stern, “Four Towers,” A+U Architecture and Urbanism 172 (January 1985): 35-42, 49-59; Philip Johnson and John Burgee, Philip Johnson/John Burgee Architects, 1979-1985, introduction by Carleton Knight III, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1985, pp. 105-117; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 228-231.

Transco Tower, Houston
2800 Post Oak Boulevard
1983, Johnson/Burgee Architects and Morris Aubry Architects
Paul Goldberger, The Skyscraper New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1982, pp. 156-157; Jim Murphy, “It Towers,” Progressive Architecture 65 (February 1984): 94-97; Beverly Russell, “Powerful Tower,” Interiors 144 (December 1984): 132-143; “John Burgee Architects with Philip Johnson: Transco Tower,” GA Document 12 (December 1985): 97-109; Robert A. M. Stern, “Four Towers,” A+U Architecture and Urbanism 172 (January 1985): 43-48, 49-59; Steve Brady, Presence: The Transco Tower, text by Ann Holmes, Houston: Herring Press, 1985; Elizabeth McBride, “The Transco Fountain,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Summer 1985): 19-21; Philip Johnson and John Burgee, Philip Johnson/John Burgee Architects, 1979-1985, introduction by Carleton Knight III, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1985, pp. 72-79; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 216-221.

Allied Bank Plaza
1000 Louisiana Street
Houston
1983, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (San Francisco) and Lloyd Jones Brewer & Associates
Janet Nairn, “Skidmore, Owings & Merrill: New Directions in High-Rise Design,” Architectural Record 169 (March 1981): 128-129; “Skidmore, Owings & Merrill: Allied Bank Plaza, Houston, Texas, Design: 1980; Construction: 1981-1983,” GA Document 12 (December 1985): 96-88; “Allied Bank Plaza, Houston, Texas, USA: Skidmore, Owings & Merrill,” A+U 177 (June 1985): 43-48; Albert Bush-Brown, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill: Architecture and Urbanism, 1978-1983, New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Co., 1984, pp. 204-207; Maeve Slavin, The Lone Star State Streaks Ahead,” Interiors 143 (November 1983): 73-77; John Pastier, “A Tale of Two Towers,” Architecture 73 (April 1984): 38-43.

ARCO Building
1601 Bryan Street, Dallas
1983, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York)
Edie Lee Cohen, “Arco Tower, Dallas,” Interior Design 55 (August 1984): 146-155.

Mobil Exploration and Production Research Laboratory
13777 Midway Road, Farmers Branch
1983, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York)
Loring Leifer, “Upward Mobility in Open Office Design,“ Interiors 143 (March 1984): 109-113; Nora Richter Greer, “Lighting as a Tool of Design,” Architecture 73 (October 1984): 58; Andrea Truppin, “The Art of Attitudes,” Interiors 144 (November 1984): 144-145.

Charlton House
4608 Meadowood Road, Dallas
1983, Edward Larrabee Barnes and Amir B. Avakian (New York)
Herbert L. Smith, Jr., “Private House, Dallas, Texas, by Edward Larrabee Barnes and Amir B. Avakian,” Architectural Record 172 (Mid-May 1984): 112-121; David Dillon, “Blend of Modernism and Regionalism,” Architecture 75 (May 1986): 176-183; Edward Larrabee Barnes, Edward Larrabee Barnes, Architect, introduction by Peter Blake, New York: Rizzoli International Press, 1994, pp. 54-61.

Haddon Townhouses
2013-2029 Haddon St., Houston
1983, Arquitectónica (Miami)
“An Introductory Passage,” Architectural Record 172 (August 1984): 86-91; Beth Dunlop, Arquitectonica, foreword by Philip Johnson, Washington DC: American Institute of Architects Press, 1991, pp. 56-57.

Greenhill Lower School
4141 Spring Valley Road, Addison
1984, Gwathmey, Siegel & Associates (New York)

Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas
1717 North Harwood Street
1984, Edward Larrabee Barnes (New York) and Pratt, Box & Henderson
David Dillon, “Dallas Arts District,” Progressive Architecture 64 (June 1983): 35, 37; John Morris Dixon, “Art Oasis: Dallas Museum of Art,” Progressive Architecture 65 (April 1984): 127-136; :Edward Larrabee Barnes: Dallas Museum of Art, Dallas, Texas, Design: 1978-1980; Completion: 1983,” GA Document 10 (May 1984): 66-75; “Dallas Museum of Arts, Dallas, Texas, 1983,” A+U 168 (September 1984): 29-38; Peter C. Papademetriou, “Dallas Museum of Art: Extending the Modernist Tradition of E. L. Barnes,” Texas Architect 35 (January-February 1985): 36-47; Joel Warren Barna, “Dallas Museum Addition Marks Reorganization,” Progressive Architecture 74 (December 1993): 12; Edward Larrabee Barnes, Edward Larrabee Barnes, Architect, introduction by Peter Blake, New York: Rizzoli International Press, 1994, pp. 214-221.

One Broadcast Center, KVII-TV Studio
SE 10th Ave., S. Fillmore St., SE 11th Ave., and S. Taylor St., Amarillo
1984, Paul Rudolph (New York)

Towers at Williams Square
5215 N. O’Connor Boulevard, Irving
1984, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (San Francisco)

Herring Hall
Rice University, Houston
1984, Cesar Pelli & Associates (New Haven)
Peter C. Papademetriou, “Pattern and Principle,” Progressive Architecture 66 (April 1985): 86-97; David Dillon, “Combining Adventure and Respect,” Architecture 74 (May 1985): 174-181; William F. Stern, “Robert R. Herring Hall,: Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Spring 1985): 20-21; César Pelli, A+U July 1985 Special Edition, 1985, pp. 120-143; Cesar Pelli, Cesar Pelli: Buildings and Projects, introduction by Paul Goldberger, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1990, pp. 188-203.

Knoll Building Houston
2301 Main Street, Houston
1984, Tigerman Fugman McCurry (Chicago) and Ray Bailey Architects
Charless Gandee, “But Is It Avant-Garde?” Architectural Record 172 (April 1984): 114-123; Janet O’Brien, “Knoll Building, Houston,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Spring-Summer 1984): 17; “Knoll Building, Houston: Stanley Tigerman Resurrects a 1919 Building,” Interior Design 55 (June 1984): 264-271; Mark A. Hewitt, “Knoll in Houston,” Texas Architect 34 (July-August 1984): 70-75; “Tigerman Fugman McCurry, Ray B. Bailey, Associate Architects, Knoll Building, Houston, Texas; Design: 1982; Completion: 1983,” GA Document 11 (September 1984): 96-101.

Innova (altered)
20 Greenway Plaza, Houston
1984, Cambridge Seven Associates (Cambridge) and Lloyd, Jones, Brewer & Associates
Beverly Russell, “Center of Attraction,” Interiors 144 (March 1985): 124-131; Jan O’Brien, “Innova,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Winter 1985-1986): 24-25; David Dillon, “Houston Design Center Made a Monumental Cutaway Cube,” Architecture 75 (March 1986): 76-79.

Taggart Park Townhouses
6402 Taggart Avenue, Houston
1984, Arquitectonica (Miami)
Charles K. Gandee, “Those New Kids in Town,” Architectural Record 173 (June 1985): 116-123; Douglas Milburn, “P.S. I Don’t Quite Love You,” Architectural Record 173 (June 1985): 133; Beth Dunlop, Arquitectonica, foreword by Philip Johnson, Washington DC: American Institute of Architects Press, 1991, pp. 54-55.

Milford Townhomes
1220 Milford Street, Houston
1984, Arquitectonica (Miami)
Charles K. Gandee, “Those New Kids in Town,” Architectural Record 173 (June 1985): 116-117, 128-132; Douglas Milburn, “P.S. I Don’t Quite Love You,” Architectural Record 173 (June 1985): 133.

Mandell Residences
4901-4903 Mandell Street, Houston
1985, Arquitectonica (Miami)
Charles K. Gandee, “Those New Kids in Town,” Architectural Record 173 (June 1985): 116-117, 126-127; Douglas Milburn, “P.S. I Don’t Quite Love You,” Architectural Record 173 (June 1985): 133; Beth Dunlop, Arquitectonica, foreword by Philip Johnson, Washington DC: American Institute of Architects Press, 1991, pp. 82-84.

The Mesa: A Better Home and Living Center
5551 Chimney Rock Street, Houston
1985, Arquitectonica (Miami)
Stephan Hoffpauir, “The Mesa,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Summer 1985): 22-23.

Mesa West
7756 Northcross Dr., Austin
1985, Arquitectonica (Miami)
Kenneth Hafertepe, “Austin Buildings,” in Austin: Its Architects and Architecture (1836-1986), ed.Hank Todd Smith, Austin: Austin Chapter American Institute of Architects, 1986, p. 48.

Conoco Building
600 North Dairy Ashford Road, Houston
1985, Kevin Roche, John Dinkeloo & Associates (Hamden)
Kevin Roche, Kevin Roche, introduction by Francesco Dal Co, Milan: Electra Editrice, 1985, pp. 230-231; Nory Miller, “Kevin Roche, John Dinkeloo & Associates: Conoco Inc., Petroleum Headquarters, Houston, Texas; Designed: 1979; Completed 1985,” GA Documents 14 (December 1985): 48-61; Carleton Night III, Serene Pavilions Traversing a Lake,” Architecture 75 (December 1986): 56-61; “Conoco, Inc., Petroleum Headquarters, Houston, Texas, 1979-1984,” A+U Extra Edition 8 (August 1987): 160-167; William F. Stern, “Floating City,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Fall 1989): 12-13.

HEB Company Headquarters
646 South Main Avenue, San Antonio
1985, Hartman-Cox (Washington DC) and Chumney/Urrutia
Leonard Lane, “HEB Pulls Out the Artillery for Its Supermarket Offices,” Texas Architect 35 (November-December 1985): 104-109; David Dillon, “The Alamo and Other Battles,” Architecture 75 (March 1986): 118-125; M. Stephanie Stubbs, “’80s Retrospective: Attention to Its Users,” Architecture 78 (December 1989): 45-57; George E. Hartman, Hartman-Cox: Selected and Current Works, introduction by Richard Guy Wilson, Mulgrave: The Image Publishing Group, 1994, pp. 107-113.

The Crescent
Cedar Springs Road and Pearl Street, Dallas
1985, Johnson/Burgee (New York) and Shepherd & Partners
Philip Johnson and John Burgee, Philip Johnson/John Burgee Architects, 1979-1985, introduction by Carleton Knight III, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1985, pp. 130-133; Michael Sorkin, “The Real Thing,” Architectural Record 174 (September 1986): 78-85; Justin Henderson, “The Hotel Crescent Court in Dallas Is Inspired by the Grand Hotels of the 19th Century,” Interiors 148 (November 1988): 35-36; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 256-257.

Frito Lay Building
7701 Legacy Drive, Plano
1986, Fujikawa, Conterato Lohan (Chicago)
Andrea Truppin, “Human Nature,” Interiors 146 (November 1986): 129-137; Kay Tiller, “Frito-Lay’s Prairie Campus,” Landscape Architecture 78 (April-May 1988): 40-45.

Townhouses
4102-4110 Douglas, Dallas
1986, Arquitectonica (Miami)

Hard Rock Café
2801 Kirby Drive, Houston (demolished)
1986, Tigerman Fugman McCurry (Chicago) and Ray Bailey Architects
Jan O’Brien, “Soft Images for the Hard Rock,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Spring 1986): 9.

Lillie and Hugh Roy Cullen Sculpture Garden, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
Bissonnet Ave. and Montrose Blvd., Houston
1986, Isamu Noguchi (Long Island City) and Fuller & Sadao
Peter C. Papademetriou, “Noguchi Garden in Houston,” Progressive Architecture 67 (July 1986): 25-26; Andrew Bartle, “Romancing the Stone: the Cullen Sculpture Garden by Isamu Noguchi,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Fall 1986): 14-15; Jamie Lofgren, “Seeing Houston With a Sculptor’s Eye,” Texas Architect 37 (July-August 1987): 38-41; Alison de Lima Greene, Valerie J. Fletcher, and Marc Treib, Isamu Noguchi: A Sculpture for Sculpture: The Lillie and Hugh Roy Cullen Sculpture Garden, photography by Rocky Kneten, Houston: The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, 2006.

Fountain Place
1445 Ross Avenue, Dallas
1986, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York), Harry Weese & Associates (Chicago) and WZMH
“ I, M, Pei & Associates: Fountain Place Central Business District Development-Phase I, Dallas, Texas; Design: 1982-1983; Construction: 1983-1986,” GA Document 12 (January 1985): 94-95; Robin Karson, “Conversation with Dan Kiley,” Landscape Architecture 76 (March-April 1986): 56-57; David Dillon, “Constantly Changing Minimalist Tower,” Architecture 75 (December 1986): 44-49; David Dillon, “The People Commandeer a Plaza,” Landcape Architecture 81 (January 1991): 44-46; George Hazelrigg, “Still Walking on Water,” Landscape Architecture 96 (October 2006): 78.

College of Architecture Building
University of Houston, Houston
1986, Johnson/Burgee (New York) and Morris Aubry Architects
Mark A. Hewitt, “Much Ledoux About Nopthing?” Cite: The Architecture and Design review of Houston (Fall 1983): 8-9;Philip Johnson and John Burgee, Philip Johnson/John Burgee Architects, 1979-1985, introduction by Carleton Knight III, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1985, pp. 136-139; Allen Freeman, “Architecture School Patterned on 18th-Century Precedent,” Architecture 75 (March 1986): 84-87; John Kaliski, “Master Johnson’s House of Education,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston, Summer 1986, pp. 16-18; Michael Sorkin, “The Real Thing,” Architectural Record 174 (September 1986): 78-85; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 250-253.

Momentum Place
1717 Main Street, Dallas
1987, Johnson/Burgee (New York) and HKS Architects
“John Burgee Architects with Philip Johnson: Transco Tower,” GA Document 12 (December 1985): 25; Philip Johnson and John Burgee, Philip Johnson/John Burgee Architects, 1979-1985, introduction by Carleton Knight III, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1985, pp. 140-141; Frank D. Welch, Philip Johnson and Texas. Foreword by Philip Johnson, photographs by Paul Hester. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2000; Richard Payne, The Architecture of Philip Johnson, essay by Hilary Lewis, Boston: Bulfinch Press, 2002, pp. 264-267.

Menil Collection
1515 Sul Ross Avenue, Houston
1987, Renzo Piano (Genoa) and Richard Fitzgerald & Associates
Peter Davey, “Piano Practice: Menil Collection Art Museum,” Architectural Review181 (March 1987): 36-42; Peter C. Papademetriou, “The Responsive Box,” Progressive Architecture 68 (May 1987): 87-97; John Pastier, “Simplicity of Form, Ingenuity in the Use of Daylight,” Architecture 76 (May 1987): 84-91; Richard Ingersoll, “Pianissimo: The Very Quiet Menil Collection,” Texas Architect 37 (May-June 1987): 40-47; Deborah K. Dietsch, “Ove Arup & Partners: The Engineer as Designer,” Architectural Record 175 (September 1987): 124-125; Mary McAuliffe, “The Erasure of the Canopy: Spatial Definition at the Menil Museum,” Crit 19 (Winter 1987): 32-37; “AIA Honor Awards 1988,” Architecture 77 (May 1988): 155; Peter Buchanan, Renzo Piano Building Workshop: Complete Works, Volume 1, London: Phaidon Press, Ltd., 1993.

Lucile Halsell Conservatory, San Antonio Botanical Center
555 Funston Place, San Antonio
1988, Emilio Ambasz (New York) and Chumney Jones & Kell
Douglas Brenner, “Et in Arcadia Ambasz,” Architectural Record 172 (September 1984): 120-121, 126-127; “The Lucile Halsell Conservatory,” Progressive Architecture 66 (January 1985): 120-121; Andrea Truppin, “Inventive Genius,” Interiors 146 (April 1987): 187; David Dillon, “Drama of Nature and Form,” Architecture 77 (May 1988): 148-153; Natalye L. appel, “Paradise Made: Two New Gardens in Texas,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Spring-Summer 1988): 13-15; Mark Alden Branch, “Paradise Missed,” Progressive Architecture 76 (June 1995): 86-91.

Robert Hoffman House
9019 Broken Arrow Lane, Dallas
1988, Charles Moore and Mullen Architects
Patrick Peters, “An Aedicula for the Prodigal Sun,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Fall 1989): 16.

Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center
2301 Flora Street, Dallas
1989, I. M. Pei & Partners (New York)
Joel Warren Barna, “Meyerson Symphony Center: A Preview of I. M. Pei’s New Twist,” Texas Architect 39 (September-October 1989); 40-41; Joel Warren Barna, “Pei’s Dallas Hall Opens,” Progressive Architecture 70 (November 1989): 23, 26; Bruno Suner, “Contrapunto barroco: I. M. Pei en Dallas,” Arquitectura Viva 10 (January-February 1990): 18-20; “Pei: L’Auditorium de Dallas,” L’Architecture d’Aujour d’Hui 268 (April 1990): 162-171; “The Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center, Dallas, Texas,” A+U 242 (November 1990): 7-37; Laurie Shulman, The Meyerson Symphony Center: Building a Dream, introduction by Morton H. Meyerson, Denton: University of North Texas Press, 2000; Carter Wiseman, I. M. Pei: A Profile in American Architecture, New York: Harry N. Abrams, Publishers, 1990, pp. 264-286; I. M. Pei: Complete Works, ed. by Philip Jodido, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2008, pp. 188-193.

Cityplace Tower
2711 North Haskell Boulevard, Dallas
1989, Cossutta & Associates
Charles E. Gallatin, “Four Dallas Projects,” Texas Architect 36 (July-August 1986): 48-49; David Dillon, “Zoned to Sell: Learning from Dallas,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Fall 1991): 21-23.

National Bank of Commerce Building
112 East Pecan Street, San Antonio
1989, Cambridge Seven Associates (Cambridge) and Lloyd Jones Filpott
Blair Calvert Fitzsimons, “Design Unveiled for San Antonio Bank Tower,” Texas Architect 37 (September-October 1987): 12.

IBM Westlake
5 West Kirkwood Boulevard, Westlake
1989, Mitchell/Giurgola Associates (Philadelphia), Office of Peter Walker and Martha Schwarz (San Francisco)
“Westlake and Southlake Office Development and Village Center,” Landscape Architecture 78 (November 1988): 69-71; Joel W. Barna, “Solana in the Sun,” Progressive Architecture 70 (April 1989): 65-74; David Dillon, “IBM’s Colorful ‘Place in the Sun,’” Architecture 78 (May 1989): 100-107 Daralice D. Boles, “PA Profile: Peter Walker and Martha Schwarz,” Progressive Architecture 70 (July 1989): 60; Ann Jarmusch, “Solana,” Landscape Architecture 79 (October 1989): 102-104; The Architecture of Ricardo Legorreta, ed. by Wayne Attoe with Sydney H. Brisker, Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990, pp. 86-93; Mark Alden Branch, “Silence at Solana,” Progressive Architecture 75 (December 1994): 74-77; John V. Mutlow, The Poetic Architecture of Ricardo Legorreta, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1997, pp. 112-119.

IBM Southlake
State Highway 114 and Kirkwood Boulevard, Southlake
1989, Legorreta Arquitectos (Mexico DF) and Leason Pomeroy Associates, Office of Peter Walker and Martha Schwarz (San Francisco)
“Westlake and Southlake Office Development and Village Center,” Landscape Architecture 78 (November 1988): 69-71; Joel W. Barna, “Solana in the Sun,” Progressive Architecture 70 (April 1989): 65-74; David Dillon, “IBM’s Colorful ‘Place in the Sun,’” Architecture 78 (May 1989): 100-107 Daralice D. Boles, “PA Profile: Peter Walker and Martha Schwarz,” Progressive Architecture 70 (July 1989): 60; Ann Jarmusch, “Solana,” Landscape Architecture 79 (October 1989): 102-104; ; The Architecture of Ricardo Legorreta, ed. by Wayne Attoe with Sydney H. Brisker, Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990, pp. 86-93; John V. Mutlow, The Poetic Architecture of Ricardo Legorreta, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1997, pp. 112-119. Mark Alden Branch, “Silence at Solana,” Progressive Architecture 75 (December 1994): 74-77.

Marty Leonard Community Chapel
4701 West Rosedale Street. Fort Worth
1990, Fay Jones & Maurice Jennings (Fayetteville AK)
David Dillon, “House of the Spirit,” Architecture 80 (March 1991): 94-97; Joel Warren Barna, “Piecing Together a House of Worship,” Texas Architect 41 (November-December 1991): 40-43; Barbara Koerble, “Texas Jones,” Architectural Review 1142 (April 1992): 38-45.

Solana Village Center
Village Circle and West Kirkwood Boulevard, Westlake
1991, Legorreta Arquitectos (Mexico DF) and Leason Pomeroy Associates, Office of Peter Walker and Martha Schwarz (San Francisco)
“Solana Arrivals Garden and Village Center,” Landscape Architecture 80 (November 1990): 36-37; David Dillon, “Of the Land: Solana Marriott Hotel, Westlake,” Architecture 79 (November 1990: 94-101; The Architecture of Ricardo Legorreta, ed. by Wayne Attoe with Sydney H. Brisker, Austin: University of Texas Press, 1990, pp. 86-93; Mark Alden Branch, “Silence at Solana,” Progressive Architecture 75 (December 1994): 74-77; John V. Mutlow, The Poetic Architecture of Ricardo Legorreta, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1997, pp. 112-119.

8300 N. Mopac Building
8300 N. Mopac Expressway, Austin
1991, Hammond Beeby Babka (Chicago)
Philip Arcidi, “Entered from the Garage,” Progressive Architecture 72 (April 1991): 88.

Alice Pratt Brown Hall
Rice University, Houston
1991, Taller de Arquitectura (Barcelona) and Kendall/Heaton Associates
Bartomeu Cruells, Ricardo Bofill, Barcelona: EDITORIAL GUSTAVO GILI, 1992, PP. 102-105; Gerald Moorhead, “Classical Music: Alice Pratt Brown Hall, Shepherd School of Music, Rice University, Houston, Texas,” Architectural Record 180 (March 1992): 74-83.

George R. Brown Hall
Rice University, Houston
1991, Cambridge Seven Associates (Cambridge) and RWS Architects
William Curtis, “St. Luke’s Medical Tower,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Spring 1991): 7; Ray Don Tilley, “Mortared Logic,” Architecture 81 (April 1993): 62-67.

St. Luke’s Medical Tower
6624 Fannin Street, Houston
1991, Cesar Pelli & Associates (New Haven) and Kendall/Heaton Associates
César Pelli, César Pelli: Buildings and Projects, 1965-1990, introduction by Paul Goldberger, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1990, pp. 176-177; Ray Don Tilley, “Urban Vigor,” Architecture 80 (July 1991): 42-45; César Pelli, César Pelli: Current and Selected Works, Mulgrave: The Images Publishing Group, 1993, pp. 38-41.

Stretto House
8939 Rockbrook Drive, Dallas
1991, Steven Holl (New York) and Max Levy
Joel Warren Barna, “Stream and Consciousness,” Progressive Architecture 73 (November 1992): 54-63; Michael Benedikt, Stretto and Style,” Progressive Architecture 73 (November 1992): 63; Enrico Morteo, “Steven Holl: Stretto House, Dallas, Texas,” Domus 744 (December 1992): 56-65; “AIA Honor Awards: Stretto House, Dallas, Texas, Steven Holl, Architect,” Architecture 92 (May 1993): 110-111; “Steven Holl: Stretto House, Dallas, Texas,” GA Houses 38 (July 1993): 32-59; Steven Holl, Stretto House: Steven Holl Architects, New York: Monacelli Press, 1996; “Steven Holl, Compressed Planar Library, Dallas, Texas, USA,” GA Houses 66 (2001): 64-69; Kenneth Frampton, Steven Holl Architect Milan: Electa Editrice, 2002, pp. 358-371; Steven Holl 1983-2003, ed. by Fernando Márquez Cecilia and Richard Levene, Madrid: Croquis Editorial, 2003, pp. 134-145; “Steven Holl: Sretto House, Dallas, Texas, USA, 1992,” GA Houses 101 (January 2008): 160-163.

House in River Oaks
2920 Lazy Lane, Houston
1992, Robert A. M. Stern & Partners (New York) and Richard Fitzgerald & Partners
Robert A. M. Stern, Robert A. M. Stern: Houses, New York: Monacelli Press, 1997, pp. 372-397; Robert A. M. Stern, Robert A. M. Stern, Buildings and Projects, 1993-1998, ed by Peter Morris Dixon, New York: Monacelli Press, 1998, pp. 34-39; Robert A. M. Stern, Robert A. M. Stern: Houses and Gardens, ed. by Peter Morris Dixon, introduction by Witold Rybczynski, New York: Monacelli, 2005, pp. 82-105.

Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas Building
2200 North Pearl Street, Dallas
1992, Kohn Pederson Fox (New York) and Sikes Jennings Kelly Brewer (Houston)
David Dillon, “Downtown Gateway,” Architecture 82 (February 1993): 60-67.

Children’s Museum of Houston
1500 Binz Avenue, Houston
1992, Venturi, Scott-Brown & Associates (Philadelphia) and Jackson & Ryan
Gerald Moorhead, “Caryakids at Play,” Architectural Record 181 (March 1993): 78-83; David Dillon, “Decorated Shed,” Architecture 82 (April 1993): 46-51; Drexel Turner, “Little Caesar’s Palace,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 30 (Spring-Summer 1993): 29-35.

House on Turtle Creek
5 Willow Wood, Highland Park
1993, Antoine Predock (Albuquerque)
Antoine Predock, Antoine Predock Architect, compiled by Brad Collins and Juliette Robbins, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1994, pp. 180-197; Kurt Anderson, “Architecture: Antoine Predock: Sensuous Modernism in Dallas,” Architectural Digest 51 (March 1994): 104-111; Clifford A. Pearson, “For the Birds,” Architectural Record 182 (April 1994): 76-83; “Antoine Predock: Turtle Creek House, Dallas, Texas,” GA Houses 42 (June 1994): 78-93; Jean Gorman, “Turtle Creek House, Dallas, Texas,” Interiors 154 (January 1995): 102-103; Antoine Predock, Turtle Creek House, New York: Monacelli Press, 1998; Antoine Predock, Antoine Predock 3: Houses, edited by Brad Colllins, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2000, pp. 172-199.

Simmons Biomedical Research Building
University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas
1993, Edward Larrabee Barnes & John Lee (New York) and F&S Partners

Cy Twombly Gallery, Menil Collection
1501 Branard Avenue, Houston
1995, Renzo Piano Building Workshop (Genoa) and Richard Fitzgerald & Associates
Shunji Ishida, “Renzo Piano: Renzo Piano Building Workshop: The Cy Twombly annex of the Menil Collection, Houston, Texas,” GA Documents 36 (April 1993): 70-71; David Dillon, “Piano Designs New Menil Gallery in Houston,” Architecture 92 (July 1993): 23; Karen D. Stein, “Art House,” Architectural Record 183 (May 1995): 78-83; “Renzo Piano: The Cy Twombly Annex of the Menil Collection, Houston, Texas, 1992-1995,” A+U 302 (November 1995): 6-17; William F. Stern, “The Twombly Gallery and the Making of Place,” Cite 34: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston, (Spring 1996): 16-19.

San Antonio Central Library
600 Soledad Street, San Antonio
1995, Legorreta Asociados (Mexico DF), Sprinkle Robey, and Johnson, Dempsey & Associates
Drexel Turner, “Going South: The New San Antonio Main Library,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Fall 1991): 10-12; David Dillon, “Texas Flower,” Architecture 85 (October 1995): 80-87: John V. Mutlow, The Poetic Architecture of Ricardo Legorreta, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1997, pp. 184-193; “Legorreta Arquitectos: San Antonio Main Library, San Antonio, Texas, USA,” GA Documents 55 (June 1998): 120-129; Louise Noelle, “Ricardo Legorrerta: Biblioteche per il nuovo secolo,” Architettura 531 (January 2000): 34-43; Ricardo Legorreta GA Document Exyta 14, ed. and photographs by Yukio Futagawa, Tokyo: A.D.A. Edita Tokyo, 2000, pp. 84-95.

Hilltop House
Toro Canyon Road, Austin
1996, Gwathmey, Siegel & Associates (New York)
Ten Houses: Gwathmey Siegel, ed Oscar Riera Ojeda, Gloucester: Rockport Publishers, 1995, pp. 88-95; “Gwathmey Siegel: Hilltop Residence, Austin, Texas, USA,” GA Houses 48 (March 1996): 44-47; Charles Gwathmey and Richard Siegel, Gwathmey Siegel Houses, ed Brad Collins, foreword by Robert Siegel, preface by Robert A. M. Stern, introduction by Paul Goldberger, New York: Monacelli Press, 2000, pp.400-463;,Charles Gwathmey and Robert Siegel, Gwathmey Siegel: Buildings and Projects 1992-2002, ed Brad Collins, introduction by Robert A. M. Stern, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2003,92-107

Woodlands High School
6106 Research Forest Drive, The Woodlands
1996, Perkins & Will (Chicago) and PBK Architects
“The Woodlands High School, The Woodlands, Texas,” Architecture 83 (March 1994): 39.

Anne and Charles Duncan Hall
Rice University, Houston
1996, John Outram (London) and Kendall/Heaton Associates
Richard Ingersoll, “Quasimodo Returns,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 32 (Fall 1994-Winter 1995): 6-7.

Holocaust Museum Houston
5401 Caroline Street, Houston
1996, Ralph Appelbaum Associates (New York) and Mark S. Mucasey
Reed Kroloff, “Dark Remembrance,” Architecture 85 (November 1996): 114-119.

Herman and Elaine Proler Family Chapel
Beth Israel Cemetery, Houston
1997, Daniel Solomon (San Francisco) and Barry Moore
Peter Rockrise, “Beth Israel Chapel and Cemetery,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 30 (Spring-Summer 1993): 4; Joseph Giovannini, “Sacred Ground,” Architecture 87 (June 1998): 128-133; Bruce Webb, “Proler Chapel at Woodlawn Cemetery,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 40 (Winter 1997-1998): 40-41; Frank Edgerton Martin, “Nature and the Journey to the Final Resting Place,” Landscape Architecture 91 (May 2001): 28.

Dell Butcher Hall
Rice University, Houston
1997, Antoine Predock (Albuquerque) and Brooks/Collier
Antoine Predock, Antoine Predock Architect 2, edited by Brad Collins and Elizabeth Zimmermann, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1998, pp. 166-179; Gerald Moorhead, “Making Connections,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 48 (Summer 2000): 11-13.

Byzantine Fresco Chapel Museum
4011 Yupon Street, Houston
1997, Francois de Menil (New York)
“Fresco Chapel,” Progressive Architecture 76 (January 1995): 100-101; Joseph Giovannini, “Modern Reliquary,” Architecture 86 (April 1997): 67-75; Jonathan Hagood, “A Spiritual Display,” Texas Architect 47 (September-October 1997): 74-75; Catherine Slessor, “Out of This World,” Architectural Review 1215 (May 1998): 82-85.

Shorthand House
2233 University Boulevard, Houston
1997, Francois de Menil (New York)
Edie Cohen, “The Shorthand House,” Interior Design 69 (October 1998): 124-131.

Sonic 2000
Richardson
1997, Machado & Silvetti Associates (Boston) and Boice-Raidl-Rhea
Richard Ingersoll, “Super Sonic,” Architecture 87 (May 1998): 104-107.

James A. Baker III Hall
Rice University, Houston
1997, Hammond Beeby Babka (Chicago) and Morris Architects

Howard Rachofsky House,
8605 Preston Road, Dallas
1997, Richard Meier & Partners (New York)
Richard Meier, Richard Meier Houses, 1962-1997, introduction by Paul Goldberger, essay by Richard Rogers, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1996, pp. 216-223; “Richartd Meier: Rachofsky House, Dallas, Texas,” GA Houses 51 (March 1997): 70-85; Thomas S. Hines, “Richard Meier: Bridhing the Public and Private Realms in a Dallas House,” Architectural Digest 54 (April 1997): 118-127; “Howard’s House,” Architecture 86 (July 1997): 71-79; Richard Meier, Richard Meier, Architect, 1992-1999, essays by Kenneth Frampton, Joseph Rykwert, and Arata Isozaki, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 1999, pp. 26-47; Richard Meier, Richard Meier, Architect, New York and Los Angeles: Monacelli Press and Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, 1999, pp. 240-247; “Richard Meier: Rachofsky House, Dallas, Texas, USA, 1991-1996,” A+U 397 (October 2003): 102-110; Richard Meier, Richard Meier: Houses and Apartments, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2007, pp. 82-99.

Mary D. and F. Howard Walsh Center for the Performing Arts
2800 S. University Dr., Fort Worth
1998, Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates (New York) and KVG Gideon Toal
Susan Williamson, “Student Performance,” Texas Architect 47 (March-April 1997): 54; David Dillon, “A Pair of Performing Arts Centers in Texas,” Architectural Record 187 (May 1999): 232-239.

Lisa Blue and Fred Baron House
5950 Deloache Avenue, Dallas
1999, Robert A. M. Stern (New York)
Robert A. M. Stern, Robert A. M. Stern: Buildings and Projects, 1993-1999, ed. by Peter Morris Dixon, New York: Monacelli Press, 1998, pp. 190-191; Philip Nobel, “A Shining Lone Star: Robert A. M. Stern Takes on a Texas-Size Commission,” Architectural Digest 60 (October 2003): 270-276; Robert A. M. Stern, Robert A. M. Stern: Houses and Gardens, ed. by Peter Morris Dixon, introduction by Witold Rybczynski, New York: Monacelli Press, 2005, pp. 194-227.

San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts
1 Love Street, San Angelo
1999, Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates (New York) and Chakos Zentner Marcum
Lawrence Connolly, “New Museum for San Angelo,” Texas Architect 49 (July-August 1999): 13; David Dillon, “Brash Beauty: A Bold, Quirky Building by HHPA’s Malcolm Holzman for Texas’s San Angelo Museum of Fine Arts Is Intentionally Dissonant,” Architectural Record 188 (November 2000): 100-105.

Lucille Lupe Murchison Performing Arts Center
University of North Texas, Denton
1999, Hardy Holzman Pfeiffer Associates (New York)
David Dillon, “A Pair of Performing Arts Centers in Texas,” Architectural Record 187 (May 1999): 232-239; Rebecca L. Boles, “Roadside Dynamism” Texas Architecture 50 (September-October 2000): 46-49.

Virginia Tatham Fine Arts Center, St. John’s School
Westheimer Road and Buffalo Speedway, Houston
2000, Graham Gund Associates (Boston) and Morris Architects

Audrey Jones Beck Building, Museum of Fine Arts, Houston
5601 Main Boulevard, Houston
2000, Rafael Moneo (Madrid) and Kendall Heaton Associates
Martha Thorne, Rafael Moneo: Audrey Jones Beck Building, The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, photography by Joe C. Aker and Gary Zvonkovic, Opus 36, Stuttgart: Axel Menges, 2000; Farès el-Dahdah, “Shedding Light on the Beck,” Cite 47: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston. (Spring 2000): 16-21; Ned Cramer, “Palazzo Beck: José Rafael Moneo Builds an Art Palace of the People in Houston,” Architecture 89 (March 2000): 92-103; David Dillon, “Is Rafael Moneo’s New Beck Building at the Museum of Fine Arts in Houston Equally Extraordinary Inside and Out?” Architectural Record 188 (June 2000)): 124-129; Raymund Ryan, “Solid Walls; Filtered Sky: Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, USA,” Architectural Review 1242 (August 2000): 38-43; Richard Ingersoll, “Rafael Moneo: Audrey Jones Beck Building, Houston,” Casabella 682 (October 2000): 122-133; Rafael Moneo: Museoak, Audirioak, Liburutegiak, San Sebastian: Kuxta Fundazoia, 2005, pp. 72-79.

Humanities Building
Rice University, Houston
2000, Allan Greenberg (Washington D.C.)
Ned Cramer, “On the Boards: Projects at Rice University,” Architecture 90 (May 2001): 74-75.

Bayou Parkland Pavilion, McGovern Lake, and Jones Reflecting Pool and Smith Plaza and Overlook
Hermann Park, Houston
2000, 2001, 2004, Olin Partnership (Philadelphia)
2009, Overland Partners
Barry Moore, “Taking the Edge off Houston,” Metropolis 13 (June 1994): 56-57; Barrie Scardino, “Hermann Park Masterplan,” Cite 32: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Fall 1994-Winter 1995): 16-19; Jim Zook, “The State of the Park,” Cite 43: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Winter 1999): 32-35; Jay Baker, “Hermann Park Comes Full Circle,” Texas Architect 51 (November-December 2001): 16; Marty Carlock, “A New Heart: Reviving Its Heart Leads to a New Cure for Hermann Park, Houston’s Ailing Greenspace,” Landscape Architecture 96 (September 2006): 108-115.

Meadows Museum, Southern Methodist University
5900 Bishop Boulevard, Dallas
2001, Hammond Beeby Rupert Ainge (Chicago)

Act II House
1319 Banks Street, Houston
2001, FdM: Arch (New York)

Sarah M. and Charles E. Seay Psychology, Child Development, and Family Relationships Building
University of Texas at Austin, Austin
2001, Cesar Pelli & Associates (New Haven) and Page Southerland Page
Arthur Andersson, “Psychology Today: At the University of Texas at Austin, a New Classroom Building Updates Campus Design Traditions as Defined by Gilbert and Cret,” Texas Architect 53 (July-August 2003): 34-37.

Wiess College
Rice University, Houston
2002, Machado & Silvetti (Boston) and Kirksey & Partners
Ned Cramer, “On the Boards: Projects at Rice University,” Architecture 90 (May 2001): 74-75; Gerald Moorhead, ”Evolution of Form,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 62 (Fall 2004): 11-12.

Martel College and additions to Jones and Brown Colleges
Rice University, Houston
2002, Michael Graves (Princeton) and Pierce Goodwin Alexander & Linville
Ned Cramer, “On the Boards: Projects at Rice University,” Architecture 90 (May 2001): 74-75; Gerald Moorhead, ”Evolution of Form,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 62 (Fall 2004): 11-12; Michael Graves: Buildings and Projects, 1995-2003, ed. by Karen Nichols, essay by Francisco Sanin, New York: Rizzoli International Publishers, 2003, pp. 194-203.

Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth
3200 Darnell, Fort Worth
2002, Tadao Ando (Osaka) and Kendall/Heaton Associates (Houston)
Barbara Koerble, “Harmonic Progression: Fort worth’s New Modern Art Museum by Tadao Ando,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 38 (Summer 1997): 22-25; Ronnie Self, “Modern Art: Tadao Ando Intertwines Art, Architecture and Nature to Create His Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth,” Texas Architect 53 (March-April 2003): 20-31; Richard R. Brettell, “Ando’s Modern: Reflections on Architectural translations,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 57 (Spring 2003): 24-30; Michael Webb, “Ando in Texas,” Domus 857 (March 2003): 34-51; David Dillon, “Tadao Ando Brings His Concrete-and-Glass Poetry to the Texas Plains at His New Museum of Modern Art of Fort Worth,” Architectural Record 191 (March 2003): 98-113; Craig Kellog, “Museum of Modern Art of Fort Worth,” Architectural Design 73 (May-June 2003): 114-116; “Tadao Ando: Museum of Modern Art of Fort Worth, Fort Worth, Texas, USA,” GA Document 74 (June 2003): 36-49; Ronnie Self, “Una cuestión de belleza: Tadao Ando, Museo de Arte Moderno de Fort Worth,” Arquitectura Viva 91 (July-August 2003): 94-99; Miquel Adriá, “Museos tejanos,” Arquine 25 (Autumn 2003): 7; Roger Morant, “Boxing with Light: Fort Worth Modern Art Museum, Texas, USA,” Architectural Review 1278 (August 2003): 32-39; Tadao Ando” Light and Water, introduction by Kenneth Frampton, New York” Monacelli Press, 2003, pp. 234-243; Tadao Ando 3: Details, ed, by Yuki Futugawa, Tokyo: A.D.A. Edita Tokyo, 2003, pp. 50-61; “Tadao Ando, Architect, and Associates, Kendall-Heaton Associates: Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth,” Japan Architect 52 (Winter 2004): 115-116; Tadao Ando, Tadao Ando 2: Out of Japan, Tokyo: TOTO Shuppan, 2008, pp. 86-117; Tadao Ando: Museum of Modern Art if Fort Worth, New York and Fort Worth: Rizzoli International Publishers and the Museum of Modern Art of Fort worth, 2008.

Courtyard Theater
Plano Performing Arts Center
1509 H Avenue, Plano
2002, Holzman Moss Architecture (New York)

Enron Center
1500 Louisiana Avenue, Houston
2002, Cesar Pelli & Associates (New Haven) and Kendall/Heaton Associates
William F. Stern, “1500 Louisiana Street: A 21st-Century Skyline,” Cite 55: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston, (Fall 2002): 22-25.

Hobby Center for the Performing Arts
800 Bagby Street, Houston
2002, Robert A. M. Stern (New York) and Morris Architects
Malcolm Quantrill, “How Did the Hobby Center Go Wrong?” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 55 (Fall 2002): 26-27; Terrence Doody, “Knowing One’s Place,” Texas Architect 52 (November-December 2002): 30-33; Robert A. M. Stern, Robert A. M. Stern: Buildings and Projects, 1999-2003, ed. by Peter Morris Dixon, New York: Monacelli Press, 2003, pp. 256-269.

Janice and Robert McNair Hall
Rice University, Houston
2002, Robert A. M. Stern (New York) and Morris Architects
Robert A. M. Stern, Robert A. M. Stern: Buildings and Projects, 1999-2003, ed. by Peter Morris Dixon, New York: Monacelli Press, 2003, pp. 438-449.

House
3509 Crescent Avenue, Highland Park
2002, Merrill & Pastor (Windsor Beach) with Phillips Ryburn

Texas Twister House
Rey Rosa Ranch, Ellis County
2003, Mockbee Coker Architects (Memphis) and Russell Buchanan (Dallas)
“Edge House, Rey Rosa Ranch,” GA Houses 59 (February 1999): 127-129.

Nasher Sculpture Center
2001 Flora Street, Dallas
2003, Renzo Piano Building Workshop (Genoa), Interloop A/D, and Beck Architecture
“Renzo Piano Building Workshop: The Nasher Sculpture Center, Dallas, Texas, USA, 1999-2003,” A+U 400 (January 2004): 46-53; David Dillon, “Renzo Piano Creates an Oasis in Downtown Dallas, the Nasher Sculpture Center, A Building of Lapidary Precision in a Lush Garden,” Architectural Record 192 (January 2004): 100-106; David Dillon, “For Dallas an Urban Solution: Filling in the Arts District and Pulling People Downtown,” Landscape Architecture 94 (March 2004): 84-91; Richard Brettell, Lightness Rendered Artfully,” Texas Architect 54 (March-April 2004): 20-27; Robin Abrams, “The Nasher’s ‘Living’ Room,” Texas Architect 54 (March-April 2004): 28-29; W. Mark Gunderson, “Urban Garden: Nasher Sculpture Center,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 60 (Spring 2004): 24-25; Peter Buchanan, “Tuned Instrument: Sculpture Museum, Dallas, Texas, USA,” Architectural Review 1288 (June 2004): 44-53; “Oasis de arte: Nasher Sculpture center, Dallas, Texas,” Arquitectura Viva 105 (2005): 102-107; “Centro de Escultura Nasher, 1999-2003, Dallas, Estados Unidos,” AV Monografías 119 (May-June 2006): 74-81.

Latino Cultural Center
600 Soledad Street, Dallas
2003, Legorreta+Legorreta (Mexico DF) and Halff Associates

Student Union Building
Texas Tech University, Lubbock
2003, 2005, Holzman Moss Architecture (New York)

Hilton Americas-Houston
1600 Lamar Avenue, Houston
2003, Arquitectonica (Miami) and Gensler
Mark Oberholzer, “Houston’s Hilton America’s to Open, Boosting Chances for Big Conventions,” Texas Architect 53 (November-December 2003): 13; Beth Dunlop, Arquitectonica, New York: Rizzoli International Press, 2004, pp. 192-193.

Austin City Hall and Plaza
301 West 2nd Street, Austin
2004, Antoine Predock (Albuquerque) and Cotera+Reed Partners
Lawrence Connolly, “Keeping Austin Weird,” Texas Architect 55 (March-April 2005): 24-29; Antoine Predock, Antoine Predock Architect 4, ed Brad Collins, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2006, pp. 90-103.

Northup Hall
Trinity University, San Antonio
2004, Robert A. M. Stern (New York)
Michael G. Imber, “Stern Praises Trinity’s New Northup Hall on the Campus Designed by O’Neil Ford,” Texas Architect 54 (November-December 2004): 16; Mildred Schmertz, “A Divine Dialogue: Architect Robert A. M. Stern’s New Design for Trinity University,” Architectural Digest 61 (November 2004): 131, 136, 138; Vincent B. Canizaro, “Less is More; More is Loss,” Texas Architect 55 (January-February 2005): 22-25, 57.

Audubon House
9794 Audubon Place, Dallas
2004, Allan Greenberg (Washington, D.C.)

American Bank Center Bayfront Arena and Convention Center Expansion
1901 North Shoreline Boulevard, Corpus Christi
2004, Thompson, Ventulett, Stainback & Associates (Atlanta), Arquitectonica (Miami), and Gignac & Associates

House
4800 Preston Road, Highland Park
2004, Quinlan & Francis Terry (Dedham, Essex, UK) and Larry Boerders
David Watkin, Radical Classicism: The Architecture of Quinlan Terry, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2006, pp. 193-205; Mirabel Cecil and David Mlinaric, Mlinaric on Decorating, London: Frances Lincoln, 2008, pp. 246-248.

Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas Houston Branch
1801 Allen Parkway, Houston
2005, Michael Graves (Princeton) and PGAL
Michael Graves: Buildings and Projects, 1995-2003, ed. by Karen Nichols, essay by Francisco Sanin, New York: Rizzoli International Publishers, 2003, pp. 270-271; George Dodds, “Follow the Money: Houston’s Third Federal Reserve Building,” Cite 65: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston. (Winter 2005): 16-19; Donna Kacmar, “Graphic Design.” Texas Architect 56 (July-August 2006): 28-31.

Performing Arts Center
Texas A&M University-Corpus Christi
6300 Ocean Drive, Corpus Christi
2005, Holzman Moss (New York) and Cotten Landreth Kramer Architects & Associates
Jeanette Wiemers, “Texas A&M Performing Arts Center,” Texas Architect 54 (July-August 2004): 51.

Frisco City Hall and Library
6101 Frisco Square Boulevard, Frisco
2005, Holzman Moss (New York)

Architecture and Art Building
Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View
2005, RoTo Architects (Los Angeles) and HKS (Dallas)
Sarah Amelar, “Teaching by Example: Roto Raises Brickwork to Imaginative New Levels with the Architecture and Art Building at Prairie View A&M in Texas,” Architectural Record 194 (January 2006): 102-107; Anna Mod, “The Brick Wanted to Dance,” Texas Architect 56 (January-February 2006): 32-37; Ronnie Self, “Prairie Style,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 66 (Spring 2006): 14-16; Michael Rotondi, Roto: Michael Rotondi, Clark P. Stevens, essay by Albert Pope, New York: Rizzoli International Publications, 2006, pp. 207-227.

Floating Box House
900 Live Oak Circle, Austin
2005, Peter L. Gluck & Partners (New York)
“Floating Box House,” Texas Architect 56 (September-October 2006): 48-49; Joseph Giovannini, “Above and Beyond: Near Austin, Sculptured Form Becomes One With the Land,” Architectural Digest 64 (October 2007): 212-219.

South Texas Institute for the Arts
1902 Shoreline Boulevard, Corpus Christi
2006, Legorreta Arquitectos (Mexico DF) and Pender Architects
Stephen Sharpe, “Work Begins on Legorreta’s STIA Wing,” Texas Architecture 55 (July-August 2005): 12.

Globe-News Center for the Performing Arts
500 South Buchanan Street, Amarillo
2006, Holzman Moss Architecture (New York)
Ron Nyren, “The Power of Performance,” Urban Land 66 (September 2007): 84-88.

Tom Green House
505 Lake Cliff Trail, Austin
2006, Gluckman Mayner Architects (New York)

Blanton Museum of Art
University of Texas at Austin, Austin
Michener Gallery, 2006, Kallman, McKinnell & Wood (Boston) and Booziotis & Co.
Smith Building, 2008, Kallman, McKinnell & Wood (Boston) and Booziotis & Co.
Richard R. Brettell, “A Question of Size,” Cite 69: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Winter 2006): 14-17; Mark Oberholzer, “The Art of Deference,” Texas Architect 59 (May-June 2009): 56-61.

Experimental Sciences Building
Texas Tech University, Lubbock
2006, CO Architects (Los Angeles) and Adling Associates
Maryalice Torres-Macdonald, “Good Neighbor,” Texas Architecture 58 (January-February 2008): 38-43.

Science and Engineering Research Building
University of Houston, Houston
2006, Pelli Clarke Pelli (New Haven) and Kendall/Heaton Associates
William F. Stern, “Raising the Bar,” Cite 68: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Fall 2006): 26-29.

Margaret M. Alkek Building for Biomedical Research,
Baylor College of Medicine, Houston
2007, Lord, Aeck & Sargent (Atlanta)
Geoffrey Brune, “Light and Flexible,” Texas Architect 58 (July-August 2008): pp. 76-79.
Paul L. Foster School of Medicine Building
Texas Tech University Health Science Center at El Paso, El Paso
2007, CO Architects (Los Angeles)

One-Two Townhouses
608 A-B Stanford Street, Houston
2007, FdM: Arch (New York)
Ingrid Spencer, “One Two Townhouse,” Architectural Record 196 (October 2008).

Mexican American Cultural Center
600 River Street, Austin
2007, Teodoro González de León (Mexico DF), CasaBella, and Del Campo & Maru (San Francisco)
Edward R. Burian, “Cultural Monument,” Texas Architect 58 (July-August 2008): 52-57.

D6 Ranch House
North Commons Ford Road, Travis County
2007, Gwathmey Siegel & Associates (New York)

Booker T. Washington High School for the Performing and Visual Arts
2501 Flora Street, Dallas
2008, Allied Works Architecture (Portland)
“BTW High School for the Performing and Visual Arts,” Texas Architect 55 (November-December 2005): 17;Michael Malone, “Cloepfil Addresses Dallas Forum on Booker T. Washington School,” Texas Architect 58 (July-August 2008): 16.

Susan and Raymond Brochstein Pavilion
Rice University, Houston
2008, Thomas Phifer & Partners (New York)
Ronnie Self, “Inspirations,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 76 (Fall 2008): 30-33; Beth Broome, “Thomas Phifer and Partners Floats a Modern temple Onto a traditional Campus With Its Raymond and Susan Brochstein Pavilion,” Architectural Record 197 (March 2009): 84-89.

Trinity River Audubon Center
6500 South Loop 12, Dallas
2008, BRW Architects and Antoine Predock (Albuquerque)
Stephen Sharpe, “Audubon Takes Flight,” Texas Architect 58 (November-December 2008): 34-39; Michelangelo Sabatino, “Dallas Reaches for the Stars,” Cite 78: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Spring 2009): 21.

Beachtown
Galveston
2008, DPZ (Miami)

Jane and Arthur Stieren Center for Exhibitions
McNay Art Museum
6000 North New Braunfels Avenue, San Antonio
2008, Jean-Paul Viguier (Paris) and Ford, Powell & Carson
Rafael Longoria, “The Evolution of the McNay,” Cite: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston 78 (Spring 2009): 12-17: Ronnie Self, “Innovative Insertion,” Texas Architect 59 (May-June 2009): 38-43; Stephen Sharpe, “Viguier Presents Design of McNay Wing,” Texas Architect 54 (May-June 2004): 8.

Grand Hyatt
600 E. Market St., San Antonio
2008, Arquitectonica (Miami), Gensler, and Kell Muñoz
South Plant
Rice University, Houston
2008, Antoine Predock (Albuquerque) and Morris Architects

Lady Bird Johnson, LeMans, and Hunt Halls
St. Edward’s University, Austin
2009, Alejandro Aravena (Santiago, Chile) and Cotera+Reed
Lawrence Connolly, “Canyon Village,” Texas Architect 59 (July-August 2009): 54-59.

Fort Worth Museum of Science and History
1509 Montgomery St., Fort Worth
2009, Legorreta+Legorreta (Mexico DF) and Gideon Toal

Margot and Bill Winspear Opera House
2403 Flora St., Dallas
2009, Foster+Partners (London) and Kendall/Heaton associates
Russell Buchanan, “Dissolving the Exterior of the Future Opera House Would Create a Unique Venue, Designer Says,” Texas Architect 54 (May-June 2004): 7; Linda V. Trinh, “Revised Winspear Concept Unveiled,” Texas Architect 55 (July-August 2005): 15, Dallas Michelangelo Sabatino, “Dallas Reaches for the Stars,” Cite 78: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Spring 2009): 18-25.

Dee and Charles Wyly Theater
2400 Flora St., Dallas
2009, OMA (Rotterdam)/REX (Seattle) and Kendall/Heaton Associates
Russell Buchanan, “After Reorganizing the Dallas Arts District, OMA’s Ramus Envisions a ‘Gateway’ Theater,” Texas Architect 54 (March-April 2004): 9, 15; “OMA: Dee and Charles Wyly Theater, Dallas, Texas, USA,” GA Document 85 (May 2005): 10-15; “OMANY: Dee and Charles Wyly Theater, Dallas, Texas, USA, 2004,” A+U 247 (April 2006): 126-133; Michelangelo Sabatino, “Dallas Reaches for the Stars,” Cite 78: The Architecture and Design Review of Houston (Spring 2009): 18-25.

Bioscience Research Collaborative Building
Rice University, Houston
2009, Skidmore, Owings & Merrill (San Francisco) and FKP

McMurty and Duncan Colleges
Rice University, Houston
2009, Hopkins Architects (London) and Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas (Norfolk)
Rob Gregory, “Repatriating Innovation: Hopkins Architects Leads by Example with Four New University Projects,” Architectural Review 1334 (April 2008): 78-83.

Norman Hackerman Building
University of Texas at Austin, Austin
2010, CO Architects (Los Angeles) and Evan Taniguchi

U.S. Courthouse
500 E. San Antonio St., El Paso
2010, ASGC (Anchorage) and Antoine Predock (Albuquerque)
John E. Czarnecki, “Inspired by Landscape, Predock Wins Two Federal Courthouse Competitions,” Architectural Record 190 (September 2002): 48; Anna Holzman, “Antoine Predock Architect: U.S. Federal Courthouse, El Paso, Texas,” Architecture 93 (February 2004): 40; Ed Soltero, “Courthouse Emanates From His Concept, But Without Predock’s Name as Designer,” Texas Architect 57 (November-December 2007): 9.

Brockman Hall for Physics
Rice University, Houston
2011, KieranTimberlake Associates (Philadelphia), Perkins + Will (San Diego), and Jackson & Ryan

Baker and Will Rice Colleges
Rice University, Houston
2011, Hopkins Architects (London) and Hanbury Evans Wright Vlattas (Norfolk)

Kimbell Art Museum expansion
3333 Camp Bowie Blvd., Fort Worth
2012, Renzo Piano Building Workshop (Genoa)

U.S. Courthouse
401 W. 4th Street, Austin
construction to begin in 2010, Mack Scoggin Merrill Elam Architects (Atlanta) and Page Southerland Page
Stephen Sharpe, “Interlocking Spaces Key to Proposed Design of Federal Courthouse in Austin,” Texas Architect 54 (November-December 2004): 9.

Asia House Texas
1310 Southmore Boulevard, Houston
construction in abeyance 2009, Yoshio Tanaguchi (Tokyo) and Kendall/Heaton Associates

Linda Pace Foundation
South Flores Street
2009 in design, Adjaye Associates (London)

email this Email Filed Under:

Share
  • Digg
  • Yahoo! Buzz
  • del.icio.us
  • Facebook
  • Mixx
  • LinkedIn
  • Reddit
  • StumbleUpon
  • Ping.fm
  • Twitter

4 Comments

  1. 1

    I have already learned from the list. I had the impression that there would be no way to begin making a list of outside architects’ contributions to Texan realms, and now I notice how very much “the urban growth machine” is a local operation. Despite the bigger tides of lending and public outlook that rule it, this knowledge of our own culpability in our trophy cityscape is a strange thing to feel now as I contemplate Houston – in its usual looseness, but rearranged, with its blank curtain walls reflecting something that I can’t help but accept as being more nearly personal than before.

    Glad to see you remember the Murchison Center armadillo in Denton and the Frito-Lay canyon campus. Here are some leads:
    Elijah Myers – Texas State Capitol, 1882-8. Also did Michigan, Idaho Territory, and Colorado.

    Fred Wilber (Williamsport, PA) – W.H. Stark House, Orange, 1894 – he designed another house locally, and no doubt you could double the length of our list by including the East Texas commissions for which current stylistic expertise existed only in cities of the South proper, before the era of Sanguinet & Staats
    {speaking of whether there was local skill:
    ??? – Praetorian Bldg., Dallas, 1908}

    Corlett and Welchons – some sources contend that this Hutchinson, KS, firm is responsible for Ochiltree County Courthouse, 1928. Other northern public buildings may have gone out of state too.

    John Scudder Adkins (Cincinnati)- Mansfield, the Colonel Alvin and Lucy Ball Owsley Home, Dallas, 1929

    (check this out!) Bruce Goff – Entrance Gate, Cemetery Tower and Burial Building, Brookside Burial Park, Houston, 1931 (unbuilt)

    Walter W. Ahlschlager – Mercantile National Bank, Dallas (1942or3)

    FL Wright – Rogers Lacy Hotel, Dallas, 1946 (first atrium lobby design, but stopped after sudden death of client)

    Bruce Goff – Jerry Alex Blakeley House, Highland Park, 1949 (2 unbuilt)

    Bruce Goff – the Round House (for Eddie Parker), Dallas, 1957-62 (way out of Durst-Gee’s league, to be honest)

    Harwell Hamilton Harris – 9624 Rockbrook, Dallas (please let me know if you go and visit here; I’d like to too), 1957

    Edward Durrell Stone – 5243 Park Ln., Dallas, 1957

    Bruce Goff – Dr. Elvin D. Blackwell Bldg., Bryan & Fitzhugh Sts., according to the internet, Dallas, 1961-3 (unbuilt)

    Bruce Goff – Apache Apts., Tyler, 1965 (unbuilt)

    I’m not seeing the Manned Spaceflight Center on here, but I think Charles Luckman’s talents were imported for it.

    Antfarm – House of the Century (for the Oshmans), Angleton (let me know if you’re interested in this one), 1972

    IW Coburn – 2819 Ferndale St, 1976, from the Houston Arch. Guide

    Bruce Goff – John Bass House, Amarillo, 1976 (unbuilt)

    Pei & Partners – Two Dallas Centre and Two Fountain Place, 1978 and 1982. neither phase was needed

    HOK – Galleria Dallas, 1982

    MLTW/Turnbull Assoc./Chas. Moore/Richard Fitzgerald – Sweetwater Country Club, Sugar Land, 1983

    Sir Geoffrey Jellicoe – Moody Gardens, Galveston, 1984-92?

    ??? – Bell County Expo geodesic arena

    Peter Walker and Martha Schwartz – 3700 Bay Area Blvd landscape, 1986
    Olin at the CAM sometime, Houston

    SOM – LTV Ctr (now Trammell Crow Twr) and 2200 Ross Ave., Dallas, 1987; tons in West Houston (I guess this must have been Dallas or Houston office so you left it off, yet the fact that the exporters moved here just speaks to the inconvenience of building business over distance at such high volumes. The ranks of the list would swell a lot with SOM, either way.)

    Rossetti + Assoc. – Centrum, Dallas, 1987

    ??? – HYPERMART USA, Garland, 1987 (closed 2008) This was the forerunner to, and almost twice the size of, the first Wal-Mart SuperCenter (1988 in Missouri). I lived in Garland then.
    “”" – HYPERMART USA, Arlington, 1988 It follows that every Wal-Mart in the state has been brought us by imported architectural programming, and likewise for other chains but this one takes first.

    As many LDS temples as you care to find their design provenance.

    Araldo Cossutta – Cityplace, Dallas, 1989

    HOK – MCI corporate hq campus, Richardson, 1990
    …some more in Telecom Corridor and Galatyn Park if you look, although Texas Instruments’ big fabs are done with Dallas’ own Austin Industries

    HOK – Alamodome, 1993

    Walt Disney Imagineering with [ ] – Space Center Houston, 1994

    Halvorson and Partners engineers for 2100 McKinney Avenue, Dallas, 1999

    J. Terry Bates & assoc. – Champ D’Or (look it up)

    David Schwarz – Bass Concert Hall, FW, & Dallas’ AA Center, and Southlake’s town center

    Duda/Paine (with HKS) – Frost Bank Tower, Austin

    Hnedak Bobo Group – Gaylord Texan Resort + Convention Center, Grapevine, 2004

    HarleyEllis – Baylor Sciences Building, Waco, 2004?

    Robert A.M. Stern & assoc. – Ritz Carlton Dallas I & II

    Chih C. Cho, Design Force International – Tien Tao temple, Chong Hua Sheng Mu Holy Palace, 12800 Ashford Pt. Rd., Alief

    James Cheng with [ ] – The Azure, Harwood International Center, Dallas, 2007

    Alexander Gorlin – Arnold House, 2950 Lazy Ln, Houston

    Elkus Manfredi Assoc. – The House, Dallas
    Zeidler Partnership, with local firm-in-transition TeamHaas (now Nelsen something) taking lead – Long Center for the Performing Arts, Austin, 2008

    Foad Rafii (w. Morris and others) – Spring, Austin, 2008

    Preston Partnership – The Austonian (2009), 360 Condominiums (2008)

    BOKA Powell, Perkins & Will, Shimoda Design Gp. – St. Ann Ct., Harwood International Center, Dallas, 2009

    Peter Doncaster, Booziotis & Co.(Dallas) with Nicholas Marshall of nodesign (New Orleans) and Gabriel Smith of Thomas Phifer & Partners – Dallas Center For Architecture competition winners

    3 out-of-state finalist possibilities – Re:Vision Dallas / Building Blocks Dallas competition construction, between Browder and S. Ervay, Dallas, doing due diligence

    Morphosis – Museum of Nature and Science, Dallas, 2013


    I’d be up for including landscape architects’ work too. Esp. for Jellicoe’s sake we ought to be noting some.
    Look, thanks a lot for your commitment to expression in Texan realms. These surely are stories worth marking. Is the Anchorage Foundation of Texas still functional, and, if so, what is it about?

    About that Goff house that I claimed was far surpassing his Durst-Gee home here, in mystery, harmony, invention and implementation – I do find it has the single most outstanding residential chamber in the state: http://retrorenovation.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/tess8.jpg


  2. 2

    The Rancho Encinal entry incorrectly reads,”H. Denman Schutt and Burton A. Scott (Los Angeles),” but I think the architects’ names are actually H. Denman Scott and Burton A. Schutt. I believe Burton A. Schutt also designed a home which still stands a few blocks west of Avenue “A” on West Cuthbert street in Midland, Texas.


  3. 3

    Per the list author I have learned the Midland residence appeared in a 1951 issue of House and Garden magazine. Many thanks for this fascinating tip which I hope to follow. Also my apologies and a humble correction of my “correction” if H. Denman Schutt was actually H. Denman Schutt, not Scott as I entered. There are several handsome homes and townhomes in and near the Midland Racquet Club which I believe to have been designed by Texas star architect Frank Welch, though this information is not appropriate given the nature of the list. There are a few other homes with unique enough characters in Old Midland to consider as possibly having been designed by out of state star architects, in my opinion.

    http://74.125.95.132/search?q=cache:Zs7rIbf-QRQJ:partners.nytimes.com/library/politics/camp/052100wh-gop-bush-bio.html+ivy+league+midland+texas&cd=4&hl=en&ct=clnk&gl=us&client=firefox-a

    “…Midland had a large proportion of geologists, engineers, lawyers and accountants, and Ivy League college graduates were everywhere.”


  4. 4

    I found an apple that had escaped the night
    before. People see that There are hundreds of lakes is just not possible.
    Glenn: One of angleer fishing ocean city tthe most amazing
    suite, with wonderful views of Wells Cathedral. Spinner tails are really quite long when you look at these boats
    you really want to make it interesting by putting up prize money for angling skill.
    Bluegill angler fishing ocean city anglers will want to come fishing in Michigan.
    It’s also time that the libraries get books that are not all the same.


+ Add a Comment





Offcite reserves the right to restrict comments that do not contribute constructively to the conversation at hand, contain profanity, personal attacks or seek to promote a personal or unrelated business.